Introductory Psychology: How Student Experiences Relate to Their Understanding of Psychological Science

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Many students who declare a psychology major are unaware that they are studying a scientific discipline, precipitating a need for exercises and experiences that help students understand the scientific nature of the discipline. The present study explores aspects of an introductory psychology class that may contribute to students’ understanding of psychological science. Surveys were distributed to 168 students, asking how each of several in-class (e.g., attending lecture) and out-of-class (e.g., participating in research studies) research experiences contributed to their knowledge of psychology as a science and understanding of psychological research. Students reported that in-class experiences contributed more to their understanding of psychological research than out-of-class experiences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)246-249
Number of pages4
JournalTeaching of Psychology
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

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Keywords

  • introductory psychology
  • psychological science
  • teaching

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Introductory Psychology : How Student Experiences Relate to Their Understanding of Psychological Science. / Toomey, Thomas; Richardson, Deborah; Hammock, Georgina.

In: Teaching of Psychology, Vol. 44, No. 3, 01.07.2017, p. 246-249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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