Is Angle Correction Correct?

Cole A. Giller

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of the Doppler principle to measure blood velocity is efficiently exploited in clinical practice by precisely aiming a beam of ultrasound through a superficial "ultrasonic window" at the desired target. This allows insonation of otherwise obscure vessels, but it also results in a crucial limitation: The dependence of the velocity measurements on the angle between the ultrasound beam and the direction of blood flow. When a long segment of the vessel can be imaged in one plane, "correcting" the velocity by the appropriate factor (cosine of the angle) is now standard. The result is a more accurate measurement of true velocity, and normal and pathological ranges have been established using this straightforward adjustment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-52
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Neuroimaging
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

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Ultrasonics
Reference Values
Direction compound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Is Angle Correction Correct? / Giller, Cole A.

In: Journal of Neuroimaging, Vol. 4, No. 1, 01.01.1994, p. 51-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

Giller, Cole A. / Is Angle Correction Correct?. In: Journal of Neuroimaging. 1994 ; Vol. 4, No. 1. pp. 51-52.
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