Isolated trisomy 10 in an infant with acute myeloid leukemia: A case report and review of literature

Ji Yuan, Colleen Hope McDonough, Anita Kulharya, Preetha Ramalingam, Elizabeth Manaloor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Trisomy 10 as the sole cytogenetic abnormality in AML is rare, with an incidence rate of ≤ 0.5%. It tends to affect the elderly and is extremely rare in pediatric patients. We describe a case of an 8-month-old Caucasian baby who presented with prominence of left eye and fever without lymphadenopathy or hepatosplenomegaly. Bone survey showed diffuse periosteal reaction in the femur, pelvis, maxillary and orbital bones (with fracture). CBC revealed normal white blood cell count with increased blasts, mild anemia and moderate thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow biopsy showed increased myeloblasts with bilineage dysplasia and 3-4+ reticulin fibrosis. Flow cytometry revealed blasts positive for CD34, CD33, and MPO and negative for CD7, CD13, and HLA-DR. Trisomy 10 was demonstrated by chromosome analysis and fluorescence in-situ hybridization. The patient received induction chemotherapy and achieved complete clinical and hematologic remission at day 28. However, he relapsed after three cycles of chemotherapy. Compared to the two other reported pediatric cases, our patient has some unique features such as much younger age and additional findings such as bilineage dysplasia and bone marrow fibrosis. Both reported cases and our case were classified as AML-M2 indicating that this may be a common subtype in pediatric patients. Bone involvement was present in our patient and one other case and both had similar immunophenotype (CD33+, CD7-). These findings suggest that isolated trisomy 10 may be associated with distinct clinicopathologic features in pediatric AML. Studies on additional patients are needed to establish this association.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)718-722
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Clinical and Experimental Pathology
Volume3
Issue number7
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010

Fingerprint

Trisomy
Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Pediatrics
Reticulin
Bone and Bones
Granulocyte Precursor Cells
Primary Myelofibrosis
Induction Chemotherapy
Bone Fractures
Maxilla
HLA-DR Antigens
Pelvis
Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization
Leukocyte Count
Chromosome Aberrations
Thrombocytopenia
Femur
Anemia
Flow Cytometry
Fibrosis

Keywords

  • Acute myeloid leukemia
  • CD13
  • CD33
  • CD34
  • CD7
  • Infant
  • Review
  • Trisomy 10

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Histology

Cite this

Isolated trisomy 10 in an infant with acute myeloid leukemia : A case report and review of literature. / Yuan, Ji; McDonough, Colleen Hope; Kulharya, Anita; Ramalingam, Preetha; Manaloor, Elizabeth.

In: International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Pathology, Vol. 3, No. 7, 01.09.2010, p. 718-722.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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