Justice perceptions, leader-member exchange, and upward influence tactics

Ethlyn A. Williams, Terri A. Scandura, Seema Pissaris, Juanita M. Woods

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The authors examine the relationship between leader-member exchange (LMX) and the selection of upward influence tactics. The purpose of this paper is to integrate research on perceptions of justice, LMX, and influence tactics in order to empirically test an integrative model. Design/methodology/approach: Questionnaires were administered to n=407 employed Masters of Business Administration students at a private Southeastern University in the USA. Structural equation modeling was used to test the statistical significance of paths specified in the models. Findings: Results indicate that perceptions of organizational justice have indirect effects on upward influence tactics reported. LMX had mediating effects on the relationship between interactional justice and the use of rational and coalition tactics. Research limitations/implications: The data are cross-sectional and were collected using self-reports, which limits the conclusions that can be drawn. The findings however, suggest that perceptions of interactional justice are associated with LMX, whose effects in turn are associated with the use of influence tactics. Practical implications: Coalition strategies were used more when subordinates experienced poor LMX. The research suggests that perhaps for individuals experiencing poor relationships with the supervisor, coalition strategies might present an alternative to “rational” influence tactics (which are used more in high-quality relationships). Originality/value: The current study extends LMX research by examining differing subordinate influence strategies in high- and low-quality relationships. It also extends organizational justice research by examining the effects of the interpersonal implementation of fair procedures on the dynamics between leadership and upward influence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1000-1015
Number of pages16
JournalLeadership and Organization Development Journal
Volume37
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Influence tactics
Leader-member exchange
Justice
Upward influence
Organizational justice
Relationship quality
Interactional justice
Self-report
Mediating effect
Tactics
Statistical significance
Integrative model
Design methodology
Supervisors
Questionnaire
Structural equation modeling
Master of business administration
Influence strategies
Indirect effects

Keywords

  • Influence tactics
  • Justice
  • Leader-member exchange

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting (miscellaneous)
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

Justice perceptions, leader-member exchange, and upward influence tactics. / Williams, Ethlyn A.; Scandura, Terri A.; Pissaris, Seema; Woods, Juanita M.

In: Leadership and Organization Development Journal, Vol. 37, No. 7, 01.01.2016, p. 1000-1015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Williams, Ethlyn A. ; Scandura, Terri A. ; Pissaris, Seema ; Woods, Juanita M. / Justice perceptions, leader-member exchange, and upward influence tactics. In: Leadership and Organization Development Journal. 2016 ; Vol. 37, No. 7. pp. 1000-1015.
@article{ecb32b9fa4e248b9b9091ea006af91b0,
title = "Justice perceptions, leader-member exchange, and upward influence tactics",
abstract = "Purpose: The authors examine the relationship between leader-member exchange (LMX) and the selection of upward influence tactics. The purpose of this paper is to integrate research on perceptions of justice, LMX, and influence tactics in order to empirically test an integrative model. Design/methodology/approach: Questionnaires were administered to n=407 employed Masters of Business Administration students at a private Southeastern University in the USA. Structural equation modeling was used to test the statistical significance of paths specified in the models. Findings: Results indicate that perceptions of organizational justice have indirect effects on upward influence tactics reported. LMX had mediating effects on the relationship between interactional justice and the use of rational and coalition tactics. Research limitations/implications: The data are cross-sectional and were collected using self-reports, which limits the conclusions that can be drawn. The findings however, suggest that perceptions of interactional justice are associated with LMX, whose effects in turn are associated with the use of influence tactics. Practical implications: Coalition strategies were used more when subordinates experienced poor LMX. The research suggests that perhaps for individuals experiencing poor relationships with the supervisor, coalition strategies might present an alternative to “rational” influence tactics (which are used more in high-quality relationships). Originality/value: The current study extends LMX research by examining differing subordinate influence strategies in high- and low-quality relationships. It also extends organizational justice research by examining the effects of the interpersonal implementation of fair procedures on the dynamics between leadership and upward influence.",
keywords = "Influence tactics, Justice, Leader-member exchange",
author = "Williams, {Ethlyn A.} and Scandura, {Terri A.} and Seema Pissaris and Woods, {Juanita M.}",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1108/LODJ-02-2013-0021",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "1000--1015",
journal = "Leadership and Organization Development Journal",
issn = "0143-7739",
publisher = "Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Justice perceptions, leader-member exchange, and upward influence tactics

AU - Williams, Ethlyn A.

AU - Scandura, Terri A.

AU - Pissaris, Seema

AU - Woods, Juanita M.

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Purpose: The authors examine the relationship between leader-member exchange (LMX) and the selection of upward influence tactics. The purpose of this paper is to integrate research on perceptions of justice, LMX, and influence tactics in order to empirically test an integrative model. Design/methodology/approach: Questionnaires were administered to n=407 employed Masters of Business Administration students at a private Southeastern University in the USA. Structural equation modeling was used to test the statistical significance of paths specified in the models. Findings: Results indicate that perceptions of organizational justice have indirect effects on upward influence tactics reported. LMX had mediating effects on the relationship between interactional justice and the use of rational and coalition tactics. Research limitations/implications: The data are cross-sectional and were collected using self-reports, which limits the conclusions that can be drawn. The findings however, suggest that perceptions of interactional justice are associated with LMX, whose effects in turn are associated with the use of influence tactics. Practical implications: Coalition strategies were used more when subordinates experienced poor LMX. The research suggests that perhaps for individuals experiencing poor relationships with the supervisor, coalition strategies might present an alternative to “rational” influence tactics (which are used more in high-quality relationships). Originality/value: The current study extends LMX research by examining differing subordinate influence strategies in high- and low-quality relationships. It also extends organizational justice research by examining the effects of the interpersonal implementation of fair procedures on the dynamics between leadership and upward influence.

AB - Purpose: The authors examine the relationship between leader-member exchange (LMX) and the selection of upward influence tactics. The purpose of this paper is to integrate research on perceptions of justice, LMX, and influence tactics in order to empirically test an integrative model. Design/methodology/approach: Questionnaires were administered to n=407 employed Masters of Business Administration students at a private Southeastern University in the USA. Structural equation modeling was used to test the statistical significance of paths specified in the models. Findings: Results indicate that perceptions of organizational justice have indirect effects on upward influence tactics reported. LMX had mediating effects on the relationship between interactional justice and the use of rational and coalition tactics. Research limitations/implications: The data are cross-sectional and were collected using self-reports, which limits the conclusions that can be drawn. The findings however, suggest that perceptions of interactional justice are associated with LMX, whose effects in turn are associated with the use of influence tactics. Practical implications: Coalition strategies were used more when subordinates experienced poor LMX. The research suggests that perhaps for individuals experiencing poor relationships with the supervisor, coalition strategies might present an alternative to “rational” influence tactics (which are used more in high-quality relationships). Originality/value: The current study extends LMX research by examining differing subordinate influence strategies in high- and low-quality relationships. It also extends organizational justice research by examining the effects of the interpersonal implementation of fair procedures on the dynamics between leadership and upward influence.

KW - Influence tactics

KW - Justice

KW - Leader-member exchange

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84985021216&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84985021216&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1108/LODJ-02-2013-0021

DO - 10.1108/LODJ-02-2013-0021

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84985021216

VL - 37

SP - 1000

EP - 1015

JO - Leadership and Organization Development Journal

JF - Leadership and Organization Development Journal

SN - 0143-7739

IS - 7

ER -