Kinetics of drug delivery from methylcellulose sponges

Martin Laird, Steven Brooks, Dennis Marcus, Maribeth H Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose. To quantitatively evaluate the kinetics of fluid transfer from microsurgical sponges in a laboratory model, in order to understand the kinetics of mitomycin C delivery using these sponges. Methods. The amount of fluid transferred from soaked methylcellulose (Weck-cel) sponges to small pieces of filter paper used to simulate episcleral tissue and tenon's fascia was measured as a function of time, sponge size, baseline hydration status of the filter paper, and technique of sponge application. Results. The time course of fluid delivery from methylcellulose sponges to filter paper was nonlinear, and was characterized by a rapid delivery phase over the first 15 to 30 seconds, followed by a slow phase extending to at least 5 minutes. Sponge size and baseline hydration of the paper significantly influenced the rate and amount of fluid delivered. Fluid delivery was significantly increased by replacing the sponge every minute with a new sponge. Conclusion. The transfer of fluid from a microsurgical sponge displays nonlinear kinetics, with the majority of delivery occurring in the firstl5-30 seconds. Sponge size, hydration status of the recipient tissue, and technique of sponge application are significant variables influencing the amount of fluid, and therefore mitomycin C, delivered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume38
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Methylcellulose
Porifera
Pharmacokinetics
Mitomycin
Fascia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Kinetics of drug delivery from methylcellulose sponges. / Laird, Martin; Brooks, Steven; Marcus, Dennis; Johnson, Maribeth H.

In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 38, No. 4, 01.12.1997.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose. To quantitatively evaluate the kinetics of fluid transfer from microsurgical sponges in a laboratory model, in order to understand the kinetics of mitomycin C delivery using these sponges. Methods. The amount of fluid transferred from soaked methylcellulose (Weck-cel) sponges to small pieces of filter paper used to simulate episcleral tissue and tenon's fascia was measured as a function of time, sponge size, baseline hydration status of the filter paper, and technique of sponge application. Results. The time course of fluid delivery from methylcellulose sponges to filter paper was nonlinear, and was characterized by a rapid delivery phase over the first 15 to 30 seconds, followed by a slow phase extending to at least 5 minutes. Sponge size and baseline hydration of the paper significantly influenced the rate and amount of fluid delivered. Fluid delivery was significantly increased by replacing the sponge every minute with a new sponge. Conclusion. The transfer of fluid from a microsurgical sponge displays nonlinear kinetics, with the majority of delivery occurring in the firstl5-30 seconds. Sponge size, hydration status of the recipient tissue, and technique of sponge application are significant variables influencing the amount of fluid, and therefore mitomycin C, delivered.",
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N2 - Purpose. To quantitatively evaluate the kinetics of fluid transfer from microsurgical sponges in a laboratory model, in order to understand the kinetics of mitomycin C delivery using these sponges. Methods. The amount of fluid transferred from soaked methylcellulose (Weck-cel) sponges to small pieces of filter paper used to simulate episcleral tissue and tenon's fascia was measured as a function of time, sponge size, baseline hydration status of the filter paper, and technique of sponge application. Results. The time course of fluid delivery from methylcellulose sponges to filter paper was nonlinear, and was characterized by a rapid delivery phase over the first 15 to 30 seconds, followed by a slow phase extending to at least 5 minutes. Sponge size and baseline hydration of the paper significantly influenced the rate and amount of fluid delivered. Fluid delivery was significantly increased by replacing the sponge every minute with a new sponge. Conclusion. The transfer of fluid from a microsurgical sponge displays nonlinear kinetics, with the majority of delivery occurring in the firstl5-30 seconds. Sponge size, hydration status of the recipient tissue, and technique of sponge application are significant variables influencing the amount of fluid, and therefore mitomycin C, delivered.

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