Knowledge acquisition: An infectious diseases perspective

John S. Czachor, H. Bradford Hawley, Ronald J. Markert, Barbara Lynne Schuster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A study was undertaken to evaluate the knowledge acquisition in Infectious Diseases during a one-month rotation completed by fourth-year medical students and residents. Fifty fourth-year medical students and 112 residents (internal medicine = 86, internal medicine/pediatrics = 18, orthopedics = 6, family medicine = 2) completed a one-month rotation in Infectious Diseases. The rotation took place between 1990 and 1998. The setting was community hospitals affiliated with a community-based medical school and medical school-sponsored residency programs. Medical students and residents completed a 103-item objective test (multiple choice, multiple true-false, matching) on a pre-test-post-test basis. The test covered 10 content areas including antibiotics, endocarditis, febrile neutropenia, HIV disease, meningitis, osteomyelitis, pneumonia, postoperative fever, sexually transmitted diseases and urinary tract infections. The mean score on the Infectious Diseases knowledge test increased from 65.8% to 77.4% for medical students (n = 49, paired t = 13.67, p < 0.001) and from 70.3% to 77.8% for residents (n = 95, paired t = 12.18, p < 0.001). It was concluded that a one-month rotation was effective in increasing the short-term knowledge base of fourth-year medical students and residents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)402-404
Number of pages3
JournalMedical Teacher
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 1999

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knowledge acquisition
Medical Students
contagious disease
Communicable Diseases
medical student
resident
Medical Schools
medicine
Febrile Neutropenia
Knowledge Bases
sexually transmitted disease
Community Hospital
Osteomyelitis
Internship and Residency
Internal Medicine
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Endocarditis
Meningitis
Urinary Tract Infections
school

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Czachor, J. S., Hawley, H. B., Markert, R. J., & Schuster, B. L. (1999). Knowledge acquisition: An infectious diseases perspective. Medical Teacher, 21(4), 402-404. https://doi.org/10.1080/01421599979347

Knowledge acquisition : An infectious diseases perspective. / Czachor, John S.; Hawley, H. Bradford; Markert, Ronald J.; Schuster, Barbara Lynne.

In: Medical Teacher, Vol. 21, No. 4, 01.07.1999, p. 402-404.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Czachor, JS, Hawley, HB, Markert, RJ & Schuster, BL 1999, 'Knowledge acquisition: An infectious diseases perspective', Medical Teacher, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 402-404. https://doi.org/10.1080/01421599979347
Czachor JS, Hawley HB, Markert RJ, Schuster BL. Knowledge acquisition: An infectious diseases perspective. Medical Teacher. 1999 Jul 1;21(4):402-404. https://doi.org/10.1080/01421599979347
Czachor, John S. ; Hawley, H. Bradford ; Markert, Ronald J. ; Schuster, Barbara Lynne. / Knowledge acquisition : An infectious diseases perspective. In: Medical Teacher. 1999 ; Vol. 21, No. 4. pp. 402-404.
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