Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of obstetricians-gynecologists regarding the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus infection

Bradley O. Boekeloo, David L. Rabin, Steven Scott Coughlin, Miriam H. Labbok, Jacqueline C. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: To determine the knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, and practices of obstetricians-gynecologists regarding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention. Methods: Office-based obstetricians-gynecologists in the Washington, DC metropolitan area who reported providing primary care were interviewed by telephone. The survey response rate was 62% (N = 268). Results: The percentages of obstetricians-gynecologists who reported regularly assessing the HIV risk of new adolescent and adult patients were 67 and 40%, respectively. Seventy-two percent reported regularly counseling patients at risk to use condoms for vaginal intercourse, and 60% regularly counseled patients at risk to limit their number of sexual partners. The level of general risk-factor assessment and confidence in the ability to reduce patients’ HIV risk were the strongest correlates of the frequency and thoroughness of HIV risk assessment and counseling. Conclusions: The percentage of obstetricians-gynecologists who assess and counsel patients about HIV risks is below the 75% goal for the year 2000 established by the United States Department of Health and Human Services. Continuing medical education for obstetricians-gynecologists is needed to improve their knowledge and skills in HIV prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-136
Number of pages6
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume81
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993
Externally publishedYes

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Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Virus Diseases
HIV
Counseling
United States Dept. of Health and Human Services
Continuing Medical Education
Aptitude
Sexual Partners
Condoms
Telephone
Primary Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of obstetricians-gynecologists regarding the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus infection. / Boekeloo, Bradley O.; Rabin, David L.; Coughlin, Steven Scott; Labbok, Miriam H.; Johnson, Jacqueline C.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 81, No. 1, 01.01.1993, p. 131-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boekeloo, Bradley O. ; Rabin, David L. ; Coughlin, Steven Scott ; Labbok, Miriam H. ; Johnson, Jacqueline C. / Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of obstetricians-gynecologists regarding the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus infection. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1993 ; Vol. 81, No. 1. pp. 131-136.
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