Lack of association between chondrocalcinosis and increased risk of cartilage loss in knees with osteoarthritis: Results of two prospective longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging studies

T. Neogi, M. Nevitt, J. Niu, M. P. LaValley, D. J. Hunter, R. Terkeltaub, Laura D Carbone, H. Chen, T. Harris, K. Kwoh, A. Guermazi, D. T. Felson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To evaluate the relationship between chondrocalcinosis and the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA) using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessments. Methods. Longitudinal knee MMs were obtained in the Boston OA Knee Study (BOKS) and in the Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study. Chondrocalcinosis was determined as present or absent on baseline knee radiographs. Cartilage morphology was graded on paired longitudinal MRIs using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score in 5 cartilage subregions of each of the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joints. Cartilage loss in a subregion was defined as an increase in the cartilage score of ≥1 (0-4 scale). The risk for change in the number of subregions with cartilage loss was assessed using Poisson regression, with generalized estimating equations to account for correlations. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, baseline cartilage score, and presence of damaged menisci. Results. In BOKS, 23 of the 265 included knees (9%) had chondrocalcinosis. In Health ABC, 373 knees were included, of which 69 knees (18.5%) had chondrocalcinosis. In BOKS, knees with cliondrocalcinosis had a lower risk of cartilage loss compared with knees without chondrocalcinosis (adjusted risk ratio [RR] 0.4, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.2-0.7) (P = 0.002), and there was no difference in risk in Health ABC (adjusted RR 0.9, 95% CI 0.6-1.5) (P = 0.7). Stratification by intact versus damaged menisci produced similar results within each cohort. Conclusion. In knees with OA, the presence of chondrocalcinosis was not associated with increased cartilage loss. These findings do not support the hypothesis that chondrocalcinosis worsens OA progression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1822-1828
Number of pages7
JournalArthritis and Rheumatism
Volume54
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Chondrocalcinosis
Knee Osteoarthritis
Cartilage
Knee
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Body Composition
Health
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Osteoarthritis
Body Mass Index
Joints

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Lack of association between chondrocalcinosis and increased risk of cartilage loss in knees with osteoarthritis : Results of two prospective longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging studies. / Neogi, T.; Nevitt, M.; Niu, J.; LaValley, M. P.; Hunter, D. J.; Terkeltaub, R.; Carbone, Laura D; Chen, H.; Harris, T.; Kwoh, K.; Guermazi, A.; Felson, D. T.

In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, Vol. 54, No. 6, 01.06.2006, p. 1822-1828.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Neogi, T. ; Nevitt, M. ; Niu, J. ; LaValley, M. P. ; Hunter, D. J. ; Terkeltaub, R. ; Carbone, Laura D ; Chen, H. ; Harris, T. ; Kwoh, K. ; Guermazi, A. ; Felson, D. T. / Lack of association between chondrocalcinosis and increased risk of cartilage loss in knees with osteoarthritis : Results of two prospective longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging studies. In: Arthritis and Rheumatism. 2006 ; Vol. 54, No. 6. pp. 1822-1828.
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abstract = "Objective. To evaluate the relationship between chondrocalcinosis and the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA) using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessments. Methods. Longitudinal knee MMs were obtained in the Boston OA Knee Study (BOKS) and in the Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study. Chondrocalcinosis was determined as present or absent on baseline knee radiographs. Cartilage morphology was graded on paired longitudinal MRIs using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score in 5 cartilage subregions of each of the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joints. Cartilage loss in a subregion was defined as an increase in the cartilage score of ≥1 (0-4 scale). The risk for change in the number of subregions with cartilage loss was assessed using Poisson regression, with generalized estimating equations to account for correlations. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, baseline cartilage score, and presence of damaged menisci. Results. In BOKS, 23 of the 265 included knees (9{\%}) had chondrocalcinosis. In Health ABC, 373 knees were included, of which 69 knees (18.5{\%}) had chondrocalcinosis. In BOKS, knees with cliondrocalcinosis had a lower risk of cartilage loss compared with knees without chondrocalcinosis (adjusted risk ratio [RR] 0.4, 95{\%} confidence interval [95{\%} CI] 0.2-0.7) (P = 0.002), and there was no difference in risk in Health ABC (adjusted RR 0.9, 95{\%} CI 0.6-1.5) (P = 0.7). Stratification by intact versus damaged menisci produced similar results within each cohort. Conclusion. In knees with OA, the presence of chondrocalcinosis was not associated with increased cartilage loss. These findings do not support the hypothesis that chondrocalcinosis worsens OA progression.",
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T1 - Lack of association between chondrocalcinosis and increased risk of cartilage loss in knees with osteoarthritis

T2 - Results of two prospective longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging studies

AU - Neogi, T.

AU - Nevitt, M.

AU - Niu, J.

AU - LaValley, M. P.

AU - Hunter, D. J.

AU - Terkeltaub, R.

AU - Carbone, Laura D

AU - Chen, H.

AU - Harris, T.

AU - Kwoh, K.

AU - Guermazi, A.

AU - Felson, D. T.

PY - 2006/6/1

Y1 - 2006/6/1

N2 - Objective. To evaluate the relationship between chondrocalcinosis and the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA) using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessments. Methods. Longitudinal knee MMs were obtained in the Boston OA Knee Study (BOKS) and in the Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study. Chondrocalcinosis was determined as present or absent on baseline knee radiographs. Cartilage morphology was graded on paired longitudinal MRIs using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score in 5 cartilage subregions of each of the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joints. Cartilage loss in a subregion was defined as an increase in the cartilage score of ≥1 (0-4 scale). The risk for change in the number of subregions with cartilage loss was assessed using Poisson regression, with generalized estimating equations to account for correlations. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, baseline cartilage score, and presence of damaged menisci. Results. In BOKS, 23 of the 265 included knees (9%) had chondrocalcinosis. In Health ABC, 373 knees were included, of which 69 knees (18.5%) had chondrocalcinosis. In BOKS, knees with cliondrocalcinosis had a lower risk of cartilage loss compared with knees without chondrocalcinosis (adjusted risk ratio [RR] 0.4, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.2-0.7) (P = 0.002), and there was no difference in risk in Health ABC (adjusted RR 0.9, 95% CI 0.6-1.5) (P = 0.7). Stratification by intact versus damaged menisci produced similar results within each cohort. Conclusion. In knees with OA, the presence of chondrocalcinosis was not associated with increased cartilage loss. These findings do not support the hypothesis that chondrocalcinosis worsens OA progression.

AB - Objective. To evaluate the relationship between chondrocalcinosis and the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA) using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessments. Methods. Longitudinal knee MMs were obtained in the Boston OA Knee Study (BOKS) and in the Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study. Chondrocalcinosis was determined as present or absent on baseline knee radiographs. Cartilage morphology was graded on paired longitudinal MRIs using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score in 5 cartilage subregions of each of the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joints. Cartilage loss in a subregion was defined as an increase in the cartilage score of ≥1 (0-4 scale). The risk for change in the number of subregions with cartilage loss was assessed using Poisson regression, with generalized estimating equations to account for correlations. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, baseline cartilage score, and presence of damaged menisci. Results. In BOKS, 23 of the 265 included knees (9%) had chondrocalcinosis. In Health ABC, 373 knees were included, of which 69 knees (18.5%) had chondrocalcinosis. In BOKS, knees with cliondrocalcinosis had a lower risk of cartilage loss compared with knees without chondrocalcinosis (adjusted risk ratio [RR] 0.4, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.2-0.7) (P = 0.002), and there was no difference in risk in Health ABC (adjusted RR 0.9, 95% CI 0.6-1.5) (P = 0.7). Stratification by intact versus damaged menisci produced similar results within each cohort. Conclusion. In knees with OA, the presence of chondrocalcinosis was not associated with increased cartilage loss. These findings do not support the hypothesis that chondrocalcinosis worsens OA progression.

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