Leukocyte numbers correlate with plasma levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in sickle cell disease

Nicola Conran, Sara T O Saad, Fernando F. Costa, Tohru Ikuta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite a clear role for leukocytes in modulating the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease (SCD), the mechanism by which leukocyte numbers are increased in this disorder remains unclear. Hypothesizing that the chronic inflammatory state, elicited by adhesive interactions involving various cell types, might underlie leukocytosis, we measured plasma levels of proinflammatory or myeloid cytokines that play a role in leukocytosis and examined their correlations with leukocyte numbers in patients with SCD. Our studies found that, although plasma levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin 3, and macrophage colony-stimulating factor are elevated in steady-state patients with SCD, only plasma GM-CSF levels are positively correlated with the numbers of total leukocytes, neutrophils, monocytes, and eosinophils, regardless of whether they received hydroxyurea. GM-CSF levels were significantly decreased in patients on hydroxyurea therapy. These data suggest a role of GM-CSF in leukocytosis of SCD. In contrast, plasma levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, a major cytokine that induces leukocytosis due to bacterial infection, were lower than those of control subjects. These results indicate that elevated GM-CSF levels may contribute, at least in part, to high leukocyte numbers in SCD. As plasma GM-CSF levels were decreased in patients on hydroxyurea therapy, hydroxyurea may decrease leukocyte numbers by reducing circulating GM-CSF levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)255-261
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Hematology
Volume86
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2007

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Sickle Cell Anemia
Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Leukocyte Count
Hydroxyurea
Leukocytosis
Cytokines
Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Interleukin-3
Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
Bacterial Infections
Eosinophils
Adhesives
Monocytes
Neutrophils
Leukocytes
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Cytokines
  • Hydroxyurea
  • Inflammation
  • Leukocytosis
  • Sickle cell disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Leukocyte numbers correlate with plasma levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in sickle cell disease. / Conran, Nicola; Saad, Sara T O; Costa, Fernando F.; Ikuta, Tohru.

In: Annals of Hematology, Vol. 86, No. 4, 01.04.2007, p. 255-261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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