Long-acting risperidone vs. placebo in the treatment of hospital inpatients with schizophrenia

John Lauriello, Joseph Patrick McEvoy, Stephen Rodriguez, Cynthia A. Bossie, Robert A. Lasser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Maintenance treatment regimens for patients with schizophrenia are often suboptimal. Partial adherence and outright noncompliance are associated with symptom recurrence and increased likelihood of rehospitalization. Long-acting conventional neuroleptics have limited efficacy and are associated with treatment-limiting adverse events, while oral atypical antipsychotics have not improved adherence substantially. A long-acting formulation of risperidone, an atypical antipsychotic with proven efficacy, has been developed. Introduction of long-acting injectable treatment may be appropriate during inpatient hospitalization, when consequences of relapse are most evident. To support this intervention, a subanalysis of patients who were inpatients at study initiation was conducted from a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled long-acting risperidone study (N=214). Long-acting risperidone was associated with a significant reduction in total Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) score (mean change±standard error [S.E.] at endpoint: long-acting risperidone, -9.27±1.44, n=133; placebo, 0.72±2.59, n=41; P<0.001), and a significantly higher rate of treatment response, defined as ≥20% reduction in total PANSS score (50% vs. 27%, P<0.05). Significantly more long-acting risperidone patients had endpoint Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) assessments of not ill, very mild or mild (32% vs. 5%; P<0.01). Long-acting risperidone was well tolerated. Long-acting risperidone initiated during inpatient treatment may be an important strategy in improving long-term outcomes among patients with schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-258
Number of pages10
JournalSchizophrenia Research
Volume72
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

Risperidone
Inpatients
Schizophrenia
Placebos
Antipsychotic Agents
Therapeutics
Recurrence
Hospitalization
Injections

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Depot
  • Long-acting antipsychotic
  • Risperidone
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Long-acting risperidone vs. placebo in the treatment of hospital inpatients with schizophrenia. / Lauriello, John; McEvoy, Joseph Patrick; Rodriguez, Stephen; Bossie, Cynthia A.; Lasser, Robert A.

In: Schizophrenia Research, Vol. 72, No. 2-3, 01.01.2005, p. 249-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lauriello, John ; McEvoy, Joseph Patrick ; Rodriguez, Stephen ; Bossie, Cynthia A. ; Lasser, Robert A. / Long-acting risperidone vs. placebo in the treatment of hospital inpatients with schizophrenia. In: Schizophrenia Research. 2005 ; Vol. 72, No. 2-3. pp. 249-258.
@article{2e1423df6698485a8101929951c11022,
title = "Long-acting risperidone vs. placebo in the treatment of hospital inpatients with schizophrenia",
abstract = "Maintenance treatment regimens for patients with schizophrenia are often suboptimal. Partial adherence and outright noncompliance are associated with symptom recurrence and increased likelihood of rehospitalization. Long-acting conventional neuroleptics have limited efficacy and are associated with treatment-limiting adverse events, while oral atypical antipsychotics have not improved adherence substantially. A long-acting formulation of risperidone, an atypical antipsychotic with proven efficacy, has been developed. Introduction of long-acting injectable treatment may be appropriate during inpatient hospitalization, when consequences of relapse are most evident. To support this intervention, a subanalysis of patients who were inpatients at study initiation was conducted from a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled long-acting risperidone study (N=214). Long-acting risperidone was associated with a significant reduction in total Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) score (mean change±standard error [S.E.] at endpoint: long-acting risperidone, -9.27±1.44, n=133; placebo, 0.72±2.59, n=41; P<0.001), and a significantly higher rate of treatment response, defined as ≥20{\%} reduction in total PANSS score (50{\%} vs. 27{\%}, P<0.05). Significantly more long-acting risperidone patients had endpoint Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) assessments of not ill, very mild or mild (32{\%} vs. 5{\%}; P<0.01). Long-acting risperidone was well tolerated. Long-acting risperidone initiated during inpatient treatment may be an important strategy in improving long-term outcomes among patients with schizophrenia.",
keywords = "Adherence, Depot, Long-acting antipsychotic, Risperidone, Schizophrenia",
author = "John Lauriello and McEvoy, {Joseph Patrick} and Stephen Rodriguez and Bossie, {Cynthia A.} and Lasser, {Robert A.}",
year = "2005",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.schres.2004.05.006",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "72",
pages = "249--258",
journal = "Schizophrenia Research",
issn = "0920-9964",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2-3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-acting risperidone vs. placebo in the treatment of hospital inpatients with schizophrenia

AU - Lauriello, John

AU - McEvoy, Joseph Patrick

AU - Rodriguez, Stephen

AU - Bossie, Cynthia A.

AU - Lasser, Robert A.

PY - 2005/1/1

Y1 - 2005/1/1

N2 - Maintenance treatment regimens for patients with schizophrenia are often suboptimal. Partial adherence and outright noncompliance are associated with symptom recurrence and increased likelihood of rehospitalization. Long-acting conventional neuroleptics have limited efficacy and are associated with treatment-limiting adverse events, while oral atypical antipsychotics have not improved adherence substantially. A long-acting formulation of risperidone, an atypical antipsychotic with proven efficacy, has been developed. Introduction of long-acting injectable treatment may be appropriate during inpatient hospitalization, when consequences of relapse are most evident. To support this intervention, a subanalysis of patients who were inpatients at study initiation was conducted from a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled long-acting risperidone study (N=214). Long-acting risperidone was associated with a significant reduction in total Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) score (mean change±standard error [S.E.] at endpoint: long-acting risperidone, -9.27±1.44, n=133; placebo, 0.72±2.59, n=41; P<0.001), and a significantly higher rate of treatment response, defined as ≥20% reduction in total PANSS score (50% vs. 27%, P<0.05). Significantly more long-acting risperidone patients had endpoint Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) assessments of not ill, very mild or mild (32% vs. 5%; P<0.01). Long-acting risperidone was well tolerated. Long-acting risperidone initiated during inpatient treatment may be an important strategy in improving long-term outcomes among patients with schizophrenia.

AB - Maintenance treatment regimens for patients with schizophrenia are often suboptimal. Partial adherence and outright noncompliance are associated with symptom recurrence and increased likelihood of rehospitalization. Long-acting conventional neuroleptics have limited efficacy and are associated with treatment-limiting adverse events, while oral atypical antipsychotics have not improved adherence substantially. A long-acting formulation of risperidone, an atypical antipsychotic with proven efficacy, has been developed. Introduction of long-acting injectable treatment may be appropriate during inpatient hospitalization, when consequences of relapse are most evident. To support this intervention, a subanalysis of patients who were inpatients at study initiation was conducted from a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled long-acting risperidone study (N=214). Long-acting risperidone was associated with a significant reduction in total Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) score (mean change±standard error [S.E.] at endpoint: long-acting risperidone, -9.27±1.44, n=133; placebo, 0.72±2.59, n=41; P<0.001), and a significantly higher rate of treatment response, defined as ≥20% reduction in total PANSS score (50% vs. 27%, P<0.05). Significantly more long-acting risperidone patients had endpoint Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) assessments of not ill, very mild or mild (32% vs. 5%; P<0.01). Long-acting risperidone was well tolerated. Long-acting risperidone initiated during inpatient treatment may be an important strategy in improving long-term outcomes among patients with schizophrenia.

KW - Adherence

KW - Depot

KW - Long-acting antipsychotic

KW - Risperidone

KW - Schizophrenia

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=9244246782&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=9244246782&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.schres.2004.05.006

DO - 10.1016/j.schres.2004.05.006

M3 - Article

VL - 72

SP - 249

EP - 258

JO - Schizophrenia Research

JF - Schizophrenia Research

SN - 0920-9964

IS - 2-3

ER -