Loss of fenamate-activated K+ current from epithelial cells during corneal wound healing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE. The corneal epithelium provides a barrier between the external environment and the cornea. It also serves as an ion transporting epithelium. Because of its proximity with the external environment, the corneal epithelium is frequently injured through physical or chemical insult. The purpose of this study was to determine whether corneal epithelial cell whole- cell currents change during corneal wound healing as the author of the present study has previously reported for corneal keratocytes and endothelial cells. METHODS. Rabbit corneal epithelial cells were injured by scraping, heptanol exposure, or freezing. The epithelium was allowed to heal for 12 to 74 hours. Cells were dissociated from corneas, and whole-cell currents were examined using the amphotericin-perforated-patch technique. RESULTS. Cells from the wounded corneal groups had significantly increased capacitance values, indicating increased surface area compared with that of control cells. As previously reported, the primary control whole-cell current was a fenamate-activated K+ current. An inwardly rectifying K+ current and a Cl- current were also observed. In epithelial cells from heptanol-wounded corneas, these conductances were generally unchanged. In cells from scrape- and freeze-wounded corneas, however, the fenamate-activated current was absent or significantly attenuated. CONCLUSIONS. As they do in corneal keratocytes and endothelial cells, K+ channels disappear during some models of corneal epithelial wound healing. In addition, cell capacitance, a measurement of cell surface area, increases. These results suggest that substantial K+ channel activity is not required for in vivo epithelial cell proliferation during corneal wound healing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1356-1363
Number of pages8
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume40
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jun 9 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fenamates
Wound Healing
Epithelial Cells
Cornea
Corneal Keratocytes
Heptanol
Corneal Epithelium
Epithelium
Endothelial Cells
Amphotericin B
Freezing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

@article{5ab5467f6ecd4bc682ebaa95b1359737,
title = "Loss of fenamate-activated K+ current from epithelial cells during corneal wound healing",
abstract = "PURPOSE. The corneal epithelium provides a barrier between the external environment and the cornea. It also serves as an ion transporting epithelium. Because of its proximity with the external environment, the corneal epithelium is frequently injured through physical or chemical insult. The purpose of this study was to determine whether corneal epithelial cell whole- cell currents change during corneal wound healing as the author of the present study has previously reported for corneal keratocytes and endothelial cells. METHODS. Rabbit corneal epithelial cells were injured by scraping, heptanol exposure, or freezing. The epithelium was allowed to heal for 12 to 74 hours. Cells were dissociated from corneas, and whole-cell currents were examined using the amphotericin-perforated-patch technique. RESULTS. Cells from the wounded corneal groups had significantly increased capacitance values, indicating increased surface area compared with that of control cells. As previously reported, the primary control whole-cell current was a fenamate-activated K+ current. An inwardly rectifying K+ current and a Cl- current were also observed. In epithelial cells from heptanol-wounded corneas, these conductances were generally unchanged. In cells from scrape- and freeze-wounded corneas, however, the fenamate-activated current was absent or significantly attenuated. CONCLUSIONS. As they do in corneal keratocytes and endothelial cells, K+ channels disappear during some models of corneal epithelial wound healing. In addition, cell capacitance, a measurement of cell surface area, increases. These results suggest that substantial K+ channel activity is not required for in vivo epithelial cell proliferation during corneal wound healing.",
author = "Watsky, {Mitchell Aaron}",
year = "1999",
month = "6",
day = "9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "40",
pages = "1356--1363",
journal = "Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science",
issn = "0146-0404",
publisher = "Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology Inc.",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Loss of fenamate-activated K+ current from epithelial cells during corneal wound healing

AU - Watsky, Mitchell Aaron

PY - 1999/6/9

Y1 - 1999/6/9

N2 - PURPOSE. The corneal epithelium provides a barrier between the external environment and the cornea. It also serves as an ion transporting epithelium. Because of its proximity with the external environment, the corneal epithelium is frequently injured through physical or chemical insult. The purpose of this study was to determine whether corneal epithelial cell whole- cell currents change during corneal wound healing as the author of the present study has previously reported for corneal keratocytes and endothelial cells. METHODS. Rabbit corneal epithelial cells were injured by scraping, heptanol exposure, or freezing. The epithelium was allowed to heal for 12 to 74 hours. Cells were dissociated from corneas, and whole-cell currents were examined using the amphotericin-perforated-patch technique. RESULTS. Cells from the wounded corneal groups had significantly increased capacitance values, indicating increased surface area compared with that of control cells. As previously reported, the primary control whole-cell current was a fenamate-activated K+ current. An inwardly rectifying K+ current and a Cl- current were also observed. In epithelial cells from heptanol-wounded corneas, these conductances were generally unchanged. In cells from scrape- and freeze-wounded corneas, however, the fenamate-activated current was absent or significantly attenuated. CONCLUSIONS. As they do in corneal keratocytes and endothelial cells, K+ channels disappear during some models of corneal epithelial wound healing. In addition, cell capacitance, a measurement of cell surface area, increases. These results suggest that substantial K+ channel activity is not required for in vivo epithelial cell proliferation during corneal wound healing.

AB - PURPOSE. The corneal epithelium provides a barrier between the external environment and the cornea. It also serves as an ion transporting epithelium. Because of its proximity with the external environment, the corneal epithelium is frequently injured through physical or chemical insult. The purpose of this study was to determine whether corneal epithelial cell whole- cell currents change during corneal wound healing as the author of the present study has previously reported for corneal keratocytes and endothelial cells. METHODS. Rabbit corneal epithelial cells were injured by scraping, heptanol exposure, or freezing. The epithelium was allowed to heal for 12 to 74 hours. Cells were dissociated from corneas, and whole-cell currents were examined using the amphotericin-perforated-patch technique. RESULTS. Cells from the wounded corneal groups had significantly increased capacitance values, indicating increased surface area compared with that of control cells. As previously reported, the primary control whole-cell current was a fenamate-activated K+ current. An inwardly rectifying K+ current and a Cl- current were also observed. In epithelial cells from heptanol-wounded corneas, these conductances were generally unchanged. In cells from scrape- and freeze-wounded corneas, however, the fenamate-activated current was absent or significantly attenuated. CONCLUSIONS. As they do in corneal keratocytes and endothelial cells, K+ channels disappear during some models of corneal epithelial wound healing. In addition, cell capacitance, a measurement of cell surface area, increases. These results suggest that substantial K+ channel activity is not required for in vivo epithelial cell proliferation during corneal wound healing.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033008473&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033008473&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 40

SP - 1356

EP - 1363

JO - Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science

JF - Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science

SN - 0146-0404

IS - 7

ER -