Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in adolescents

Race, season, adiposity, physical activity, and fitness

Yanbin Dong, Norman K. Pollock, Inger Susanne Stallmann-Jorgensen, Bernard Gutin, Ling Lan, Tai C. Chen, Daniel Keeton, Karen Petty, Michael F. Holick, Haidong Zhu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

142 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The objectives were to characterize the vitamin D status of black and white adolescents residing in the southeastern United States (latitude: ∼33°N) and to investigate relationships with adiposity. METHODS: Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were measured with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy for 559 adolescents 14 to 18 years of age (45% black and 49% female). Fat tissues, physical activity, and cardiovascular fitness also were measured. RESULTS: The overall prevalences of vitamin D insufficiency (<75 nmol/L) and deficiency (≥50 nmol/L) were 56.4% and 28.8%, respectively. Black versus white subjects had significantly lower plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in every season (winter, 35.9 ± 2.5 vs 77.4 ± 2.7 nmol/L; spring, 46.4±3.5 vs 101.3±3.5 nmol/L; summer, 50.7±4.0 vs 104.3 ± 4.0 nmol/L; autumn, 54.4 ± 4.0 vs 96.8 ± 2.7 nmol/L). With adjustment for age, gender, race, season, height, and sexual maturation, there were significant inverse correlations between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and all adiposity measurements, including BMI percentile (P=.02), waist circumference (P<.01), total fat mass (P< .01), percentage of body fat (P < .01), visceral adipose tissue (P = .015), and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (P < .039). There were significant positive associations between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and vigorous physical activity (P < .01) and cardiovascular fitness (P = .025). CONCLUSIONS: Low vitamin D status is prevalent among adolescents living in a year-round sunny climate, particularly among black youths. The relationships between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, adiposity, physical activity, and fitness seem to be present in adolescence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1104-1111
Number of pages8
JournalPediatrics
Volume125
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010

Fingerprint

Physical Fitness
Adiposity
Exercise
Vitamin D
Fats
Abdominal Subcutaneous Fat
Southeastern United States
Sexual Maturation
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Waist Circumference
Climate
Liquid Chromatography
Adipose Tissue
Mass Spectrometry
25-hydroxyvitamin D

Keywords

  • 25-hydroxyvitamin D
  • Adiposity
  • Adolescents
  • Fitness
  • Physical activity
  • Race
  • Vitamin D deficiency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in adolescents : Race, season, adiposity, physical activity, and fitness. / Dong, Yanbin; Pollock, Norman K.; Stallmann-Jorgensen, Inger Susanne; Gutin, Bernard; Lan, Ling; Chen, Tai C.; Keeton, Daniel; Petty, Karen; Holick, Michael F.; Zhu, Haidong.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 125, No. 6, 01.06.2010, p. 1104-1111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dong, Y, Pollock, NK, Stallmann-Jorgensen, IS, Gutin, B, Lan, L, Chen, TC, Keeton, D, Petty, K, Holick, MF & Zhu, H 2010, 'Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in adolescents: Race, season, adiposity, physical activity, and fitness', Pediatrics, vol. 125, no. 6, pp. 1104-1111. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2009-2055
Dong, Yanbin ; Pollock, Norman K. ; Stallmann-Jorgensen, Inger Susanne ; Gutin, Bernard ; Lan, Ling ; Chen, Tai C. ; Keeton, Daniel ; Petty, Karen ; Holick, Michael F. ; Zhu, Haidong. / Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in adolescents : Race, season, adiposity, physical activity, and fitness. In: Pediatrics. 2010 ; Vol. 125, No. 6. pp. 1104-1111.
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AU - Stallmann-Jorgensen, Inger Susanne

AU - Gutin, Bernard

AU - Lan, Ling

AU - Chen, Tai C.

AU - Keeton, Daniel

AU - Petty, Karen

AU - Holick, Michael F.

AU - Zhu, Haidong

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N2 - OBJECTIVES: The objectives were to characterize the vitamin D status of black and white adolescents residing in the southeastern United States (latitude: ∼33°N) and to investigate relationships with adiposity. METHODS: Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were measured with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy for 559 adolescents 14 to 18 years of age (45% black and 49% female). Fat tissues, physical activity, and cardiovascular fitness also were measured. RESULTS: The overall prevalences of vitamin D insufficiency (<75 nmol/L) and deficiency (≥50 nmol/L) were 56.4% and 28.8%, respectively. Black versus white subjects had significantly lower plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in every season (winter, 35.9 ± 2.5 vs 77.4 ± 2.7 nmol/L; spring, 46.4±3.5 vs 101.3±3.5 nmol/L; summer, 50.7±4.0 vs 104.3 ± 4.0 nmol/L; autumn, 54.4 ± 4.0 vs 96.8 ± 2.7 nmol/L). With adjustment for age, gender, race, season, height, and sexual maturation, there were significant inverse correlations between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and all adiposity measurements, including BMI percentile (P=.02), waist circumference (P<.01), total fat mass (P< .01), percentage of body fat (P < .01), visceral adipose tissue (P = .015), and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (P < .039). There were significant positive associations between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and vigorous physical activity (P < .01) and cardiovascular fitness (P = .025). CONCLUSIONS: Low vitamin D status is prevalent among adolescents living in a year-round sunny climate, particularly among black youths. The relationships between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, adiposity, physical activity, and fitness seem to be present in adolescence.

AB - OBJECTIVES: The objectives were to characterize the vitamin D status of black and white adolescents residing in the southeastern United States (latitude: ∼33°N) and to investigate relationships with adiposity. METHODS: Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were measured with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy for 559 adolescents 14 to 18 years of age (45% black and 49% female). Fat tissues, physical activity, and cardiovascular fitness also were measured. RESULTS: The overall prevalences of vitamin D insufficiency (<75 nmol/L) and deficiency (≥50 nmol/L) were 56.4% and 28.8%, respectively. Black versus white subjects had significantly lower plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in every season (winter, 35.9 ± 2.5 vs 77.4 ± 2.7 nmol/L; spring, 46.4±3.5 vs 101.3±3.5 nmol/L; summer, 50.7±4.0 vs 104.3 ± 4.0 nmol/L; autumn, 54.4 ± 4.0 vs 96.8 ± 2.7 nmol/L). With adjustment for age, gender, race, season, height, and sexual maturation, there were significant inverse correlations between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and all adiposity measurements, including BMI percentile (P=.02), waist circumference (P<.01), total fat mass (P< .01), percentage of body fat (P < .01), visceral adipose tissue (P = .015), and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (P < .039). There were significant positive associations between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and vigorous physical activity (P < .01) and cardiovascular fitness (P = .025). CONCLUSIONS: Low vitamin D status is prevalent among adolescents living in a year-round sunny climate, particularly among black youths. The relationships between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, adiposity, physical activity, and fitness seem to be present in adolescence.

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