Lymphocyte phenotypes in wild-caught rats suggest potential mechanisms underlying increased immune sensitivity in post-industrial environments

Ashley M. Trama, Zoie E. Holzknecht, Anitra D. Thomas, Kuei Ying Su, Sean Lee, Emily E. Foltz, Sarah E. Perkins, Shu S. Lin, William Parker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The immune systems of wild rats and of laboratory rats can been utilized as models of the human immune system in pre-industrial and post-industrial societies, respectively. In this study, lymphocyte phenotypes in wild rats were broadly characterized, and the results were compared to those obtained by us and by others using cells derived from various strains of laboratory rats. Although not expected, the production of regulatory T cells was not apparently different in wild rats compared to laboratory rats. On the other hand, differences in expression of markers involved in complement regulation, adhesion, signaling and maturation suggest increased complement regulation and decreased sensitivity in wild-caught rats compared to laboratory rats, and point toward complex differences between the maturation of T cells. The results potentially lend insight into the pathogenesis of post-industrial epidemics of allergy and autoimmune disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-174
Number of pages12
JournalCellular and Molecular Immunology
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

Fingerprint

Lymphocytes
Phenotype
Immune System
Regulatory T-Lymphocytes
Autoimmune Diseases
Hypersensitivity
T-Lymphocytes

Keywords

  • allergy
  • autoimmunity
  • biome
  • hygiene
  • immune regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Lymphocyte phenotypes in wild-caught rats suggest potential mechanisms underlying increased immune sensitivity in post-industrial environments. / Trama, Ashley M.; Holzknecht, Zoie E.; Thomas, Anitra D.; Su, Kuei Ying; Lee, Sean; Foltz, Emily E.; Perkins, Sarah E.; Lin, Shu S.; Parker, William.

In: Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Vol. 9, No. 2, 01.03.2012, p. 163-174.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Trama, Ashley M. ; Holzknecht, Zoie E. ; Thomas, Anitra D. ; Su, Kuei Ying ; Lee, Sean ; Foltz, Emily E. ; Perkins, Sarah E. ; Lin, Shu S. ; Parker, William. / Lymphocyte phenotypes in wild-caught rats suggest potential mechanisms underlying increased immune sensitivity in post-industrial environments. In: Cellular and Molecular Immunology. 2012 ; Vol. 9, No. 2. pp. 163-174.
@article{94e8ec5d41c54357b70535bacda61c31,
title = "Lymphocyte phenotypes in wild-caught rats suggest potential mechanisms underlying increased immune sensitivity in post-industrial environments",
abstract = "The immune systems of wild rats and of laboratory rats can been utilized as models of the human immune system in pre-industrial and post-industrial societies, respectively. In this study, lymphocyte phenotypes in wild rats were broadly characterized, and the results were compared to those obtained by us and by others using cells derived from various strains of laboratory rats. Although not expected, the production of regulatory T cells was not apparently different in wild rats compared to laboratory rats. On the other hand, differences in expression of markers involved in complement regulation, adhesion, signaling and maturation suggest increased complement regulation and decreased sensitivity in wild-caught rats compared to laboratory rats, and point toward complex differences between the maturation of T cells. The results potentially lend insight into the pathogenesis of post-industrial epidemics of allergy and autoimmune disease.",
keywords = "allergy, autoimmunity, biome, hygiene, immune regulation",
author = "Trama, {Ashley M.} and Holzknecht, {Zoie E.} and Thomas, {Anitra D.} and Su, {Kuei Ying} and Sean Lee and Foltz, {Emily E.} and Perkins, {Sarah E.} and Lin, {Shu S.} and William Parker",
year = "2012",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/cmi.2011.61",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "163--174",
journal = "Cellular and Molecular Immunology",
issn = "1672-7681",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lymphocyte phenotypes in wild-caught rats suggest potential mechanisms underlying increased immune sensitivity in post-industrial environments

AU - Trama, Ashley M.

AU - Holzknecht, Zoie E.

AU - Thomas, Anitra D.

AU - Su, Kuei Ying

AU - Lee, Sean

AU - Foltz, Emily E.

AU - Perkins, Sarah E.

AU - Lin, Shu S.

AU - Parker, William

PY - 2012/3/1

Y1 - 2012/3/1

N2 - The immune systems of wild rats and of laboratory rats can been utilized as models of the human immune system in pre-industrial and post-industrial societies, respectively. In this study, lymphocyte phenotypes in wild rats were broadly characterized, and the results were compared to those obtained by us and by others using cells derived from various strains of laboratory rats. Although not expected, the production of regulatory T cells was not apparently different in wild rats compared to laboratory rats. On the other hand, differences in expression of markers involved in complement regulation, adhesion, signaling and maturation suggest increased complement regulation and decreased sensitivity in wild-caught rats compared to laboratory rats, and point toward complex differences between the maturation of T cells. The results potentially lend insight into the pathogenesis of post-industrial epidemics of allergy and autoimmune disease.

AB - The immune systems of wild rats and of laboratory rats can been utilized as models of the human immune system in pre-industrial and post-industrial societies, respectively. In this study, lymphocyte phenotypes in wild rats were broadly characterized, and the results were compared to those obtained by us and by others using cells derived from various strains of laboratory rats. Although not expected, the production of regulatory T cells was not apparently different in wild rats compared to laboratory rats. On the other hand, differences in expression of markers involved in complement regulation, adhesion, signaling and maturation suggest increased complement regulation and decreased sensitivity in wild-caught rats compared to laboratory rats, and point toward complex differences between the maturation of T cells. The results potentially lend insight into the pathogenesis of post-industrial epidemics of allergy and autoimmune disease.

KW - allergy

KW - autoimmunity

KW - biome

KW - hygiene

KW - immune regulation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84863282038&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84863282038&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/cmi.2011.61

DO - 10.1038/cmi.2011.61

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 163

EP - 174

JO - Cellular and Molecular Immunology

JF - Cellular and Molecular Immunology

SN - 1672-7681

IS - 2

ER -