Managed care in obstetrics

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Managed care has marched relentlessly through all fields of obstetric care: individual and group practices, proprietary hospitals and academic medical centers, and public health systems. Emphasis on cost containment while preserving high quality has driven the redesign of healthcare delivery. A number of models for providing effective and less expensive obstetric care are now being examined in the USA and abroad. Increased market penetration by managed care will also exert profound and possibly harmful effects on traditional academic teaching institutions. These organizations must adapt to this new environment or face the erosion of physician support and training bases. Ultimately, significant moral and ethical dilemmas will arise when patients' best interests for care are being continually brought into conflict with the physician's need to earn a living.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)258-261
Number of pages4
JournalCurrent Opinion in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume9
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 5 1997

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Managed Care Programs
Obstetrics
Group Practice Hospitals
Proprietary Hospitals
Physicians
Training Support
Cost Control
Teaching
Public Health
Organizations
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Managed care in obstetrics. / Devoe, Lawrence D.

In: Current Opinion in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 9, No. 4, 05.08.1997, p. 258-261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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