Maternal dietary supplement use and development of islet autoimmunity in the offspring

TEDDY study

The TEDDY study group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We investigated the association between maternal use of vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) supplements during pregnancy and risk of islet autoimmunity (IA) in the offspring. Methods: The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) Study is prospectively following 8676 children with increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes in Finland, Germany, Sweden, and the United States. Blood samples were collected every 3 months between 3 and 48 months of age then every 6 months thereafter to determine persistent IA. Duration, frequency, and supplement dose during pregnancy were recalled by mothers at 3 to 4 months postpartum. Cumulative intakes of supplemental vitamin D and n-3 FAs were analyzed as continuous or binary variables. We applied time-to-event analysis to study the association between maternal supplement use and IA, adjusting for country, human leukocyte antigen-DR-DQ genotype, family history of type 1 diabetes and sex. Secondary outcomes included insulin autoantibodies (IAA) or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA) as the first appearing autoantibody. Results: As of February 2018, there were 747 (9.0%) children with IA. Vitamin D supplement intake during pregnancy (any vs none) was not associated with risk for IA (hazard ratio [HR] 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.94, 1.31); neither was cumulative vitamin D supplement intake. Supplemental n-3 FA intake was similarly not associated with IA risk (HR: 1.19, 95% CI 0.98, 1.45). Similar lack of association was observed for either IAA or GADA as the first appearing autoantibody. Conclusions: The TEDDY cohort showed no evidence of benefit regarding IA risk for vitamin D or n-3 FA supplementation during pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)86-92
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Diabetes
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

Fingerprint

Dietary Supplements
Autoimmunity
Mothers
Autoantibodies
Vitamin D
Pregnancy
Glutamate Decarboxylase
Cholecalciferol
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Confidence Intervals
Insulin
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Finland
HLA Antigens
Sweden
Postpartum Period
Germany
Odds Ratio
Genotype

Keywords

  • dietary supplements
  • islet autoimmunity
  • omega-3 fatty acids
  • pregnancy
  • vitamin D

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Maternal dietary supplement use and development of islet autoimmunity in the offspring : TEDDY study. / The TEDDY study group.

In: Pediatric Diabetes, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.02.2019, p. 86-92.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{03e455283d514d289e8d17a44e05273e,
title = "Maternal dietary supplement use and development of islet autoimmunity in the offspring: TEDDY study",
abstract = "Objective: We investigated the association between maternal use of vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) supplements during pregnancy and risk of islet autoimmunity (IA) in the offspring. Methods: The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) Study is prospectively following 8676 children with increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes in Finland, Germany, Sweden, and the United States. Blood samples were collected every 3 months between 3 and 48 months of age then every 6 months thereafter to determine persistent IA. Duration, frequency, and supplement dose during pregnancy were recalled by mothers at 3 to 4 months postpartum. Cumulative intakes of supplemental vitamin D and n-3 FAs were analyzed as continuous or binary variables. We applied time-to-event analysis to study the association between maternal supplement use and IA, adjusting for country, human leukocyte antigen-DR-DQ genotype, family history of type 1 diabetes and sex. Secondary outcomes included insulin autoantibodies (IAA) or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA) as the first appearing autoantibody. Results: As of February 2018, there were 747 (9.0{\%}) children with IA. Vitamin D supplement intake during pregnancy (any vs none) was not associated with risk for IA (hazard ratio [HR] 1.11; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 0.94, 1.31); neither was cumulative vitamin D supplement intake. Supplemental n-3 FA intake was similarly not associated with IA risk (HR: 1.19, 95{\%} CI 0.98, 1.45). Similar lack of association was observed for either IAA or GADA as the first appearing autoantibody. Conclusions: The TEDDY cohort showed no evidence of benefit regarding IA risk for vitamin D or n-3 FA supplementation during pregnancy.",
keywords = "dietary supplements, islet autoimmunity, omega-3 fatty acids, pregnancy, vitamin D",
author = "{The TEDDY study group} and Katherine Silvis and Aronsson, {Carin A.} and Xiang Liu and Ulla Uusitalo and Jimin Yang and Roy Tamura and {\AA}ke Lernmark and Marian Rewers and William Hagopian and She, {Jin Xiong} and Jin-Xiong She and Jorma Toppari and Anette Ziegler and Beena Akolkar and Jeffrey Krischer and Virtanen, {Suvi M.} and Norris, {Jill M.}",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/pedi.12794",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "86--92",
journal = "Pediatric Diabetes",
issn = "1399-543X",
publisher = "Blackwell Munksgaard",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Maternal dietary supplement use and development of islet autoimmunity in the offspring

T2 - TEDDY study

AU - The TEDDY study group

AU - Silvis, Katherine

AU - Aronsson, Carin A.

AU - Liu, Xiang

AU - Uusitalo, Ulla

AU - Yang, Jimin

AU - Tamura, Roy

AU - Lernmark, Åke

AU - Rewers, Marian

AU - Hagopian, William

AU - She, Jin Xiong

AU - She, Jin-Xiong

AU - Toppari, Jorma

AU - Ziegler, Anette

AU - Akolkar, Beena

AU - Krischer, Jeffrey

AU - Virtanen, Suvi M.

AU - Norris, Jill M.

PY - 2019/2/1

Y1 - 2019/2/1

N2 - Objective: We investigated the association between maternal use of vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) supplements during pregnancy and risk of islet autoimmunity (IA) in the offspring. Methods: The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) Study is prospectively following 8676 children with increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes in Finland, Germany, Sweden, and the United States. Blood samples were collected every 3 months between 3 and 48 months of age then every 6 months thereafter to determine persistent IA. Duration, frequency, and supplement dose during pregnancy were recalled by mothers at 3 to 4 months postpartum. Cumulative intakes of supplemental vitamin D and n-3 FAs were analyzed as continuous or binary variables. We applied time-to-event analysis to study the association between maternal supplement use and IA, adjusting for country, human leukocyte antigen-DR-DQ genotype, family history of type 1 diabetes and sex. Secondary outcomes included insulin autoantibodies (IAA) or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA) as the first appearing autoantibody. Results: As of February 2018, there were 747 (9.0%) children with IA. Vitamin D supplement intake during pregnancy (any vs none) was not associated with risk for IA (hazard ratio [HR] 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.94, 1.31); neither was cumulative vitamin D supplement intake. Supplemental n-3 FA intake was similarly not associated with IA risk (HR: 1.19, 95% CI 0.98, 1.45). Similar lack of association was observed for either IAA or GADA as the first appearing autoantibody. Conclusions: The TEDDY cohort showed no evidence of benefit regarding IA risk for vitamin D or n-3 FA supplementation during pregnancy.

AB - Objective: We investigated the association between maternal use of vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) supplements during pregnancy and risk of islet autoimmunity (IA) in the offspring. Methods: The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) Study is prospectively following 8676 children with increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes in Finland, Germany, Sweden, and the United States. Blood samples were collected every 3 months between 3 and 48 months of age then every 6 months thereafter to determine persistent IA. Duration, frequency, and supplement dose during pregnancy were recalled by mothers at 3 to 4 months postpartum. Cumulative intakes of supplemental vitamin D and n-3 FAs were analyzed as continuous or binary variables. We applied time-to-event analysis to study the association between maternal supplement use and IA, adjusting for country, human leukocyte antigen-DR-DQ genotype, family history of type 1 diabetes and sex. Secondary outcomes included insulin autoantibodies (IAA) or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA) as the first appearing autoantibody. Results: As of February 2018, there were 747 (9.0%) children with IA. Vitamin D supplement intake during pregnancy (any vs none) was not associated with risk for IA (hazard ratio [HR] 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.94, 1.31); neither was cumulative vitamin D supplement intake. Supplemental n-3 FA intake was similarly not associated with IA risk (HR: 1.19, 95% CI 0.98, 1.45). Similar lack of association was observed for either IAA or GADA as the first appearing autoantibody. Conclusions: The TEDDY cohort showed no evidence of benefit regarding IA risk for vitamin D or n-3 FA supplementation during pregnancy.

KW - dietary supplements

KW - islet autoimmunity

KW - omega-3 fatty acids

KW - pregnancy

KW - vitamin D

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85058048564&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85058048564&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/pedi.12794

DO - 10.1111/pedi.12794

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 86

EP - 92

JO - Pediatric Diabetes

JF - Pediatric Diabetes

SN - 1399-543X

IS - 1

ER -