Mean microvessel segment length and radius after embolic stroke: Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM)

Asamoah Bosomtwi, Michael Chopp, Li Zhang, Zheng Gang Zhang, Mei Lu, Quan Jiang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

We offer a new means of noninvasively assessing mean microvessel segment length and radius after ischemic stroke. This method involves measuring changes in T2 and T2* after injecting an intravascular superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agent and result was verified using laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) of both normal brain tissue and the ischemic recovery region. Embolic stroke was induced in 8 male Wistar rats and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed 1 day and 6 weeks later. On MRI taken at 6 weeks, MRI of the recovery region revealed a significant increase in mean vessel size index (VSI) (5.75 ± 0.54 vs 4.81 ± 0.39 μm; p < 0.001) and decrease in mean segment length (MSL) (16.61 ± 2.33 vs 26.52 ± 3.20 μm; p < 0.001) compared to the normal contralateral hemisphere, comparable with published values. There was also a significant correlation between MSL and VSI measured by MRI vs LSCM in the recovery region and normal contralateral hemisphere (p < 0.001). Our data suggest that a) morphological changes in the microvasculature can be measured noninvasively using MRI, and b) both MRI and LSCM give comparable information about both of these important parameters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-227
Number of pages11
JournalBrain Research
Volume1381
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 24 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Animal model
  • Brain imaging
  • Brain ischemia
  • Embolic stroke
  • MRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

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