Mechanisms regulating the degradation of dentin matrices by endogenous dentin proteases and their role in dental adhesion. A review

Camila Sabatini, David H. Pashley

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This systematic review provides an overview of the different mechanisms proposed to regulate the degradation of dentin matrices by host-derived dentin proteases, particularly as it relates to their role in dental adhesion. Significant developments have taken place over the last few years that have contributed to a better understanding of all the factors affecting the durability of adhesive resin restorations. The complexity of dentin-resin interfaces mandates a thorough understanding of all the mechanical, physical and biochemical aspects that play a role in the formation of hybrid layers. The ionic and hydrophilic nature of current dental adhesives yields permeable, unstable hybrid layers susceptible to water sorption, hydrolytic degradation and resin leaching. The hydrolytic activity of hostderived proteases also contributes to the degradation of the resin-dentin bonds. Preservation of the collagen matrix is critical to the improvement of resin-dentin bond durability. Approaches to regulate collagenolytic activity of dentin proteases have been the subject of extensive research in the last few years. A shift has occurred from the use of proteases inhibitors to the use of collagen cross-linking agents. Data provided by 51 studies published in peer-reviewed journals between January 1999 and December 2013 were compiled in this systematic review.

Results: Appraisal of the data provided by the studies included in the present review yielded a summary of the mechanisms which have already proven to be clinically successful and those which need further investigation before new clinical protocols can be adopted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-214
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Dentistry
Volume27
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Dentin
Tooth
Peptide Hydrolases
Collagen
Dental Cements
Clinical Protocols
Protease Inhibitors
Adhesives
Water
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Mechanisms regulating the degradation of dentin matrices by endogenous dentin proteases and their role in dental adhesion. A review. / Sabatini, Camila; Pashley, David H.

In: American Journal of Dentistry, Vol. 27, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 203-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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