Methacholine challenge testing in Reserve Officer Training Corps cadets

Bernard J. Roth, Lynn M. Hammers, Thomas A. Dillard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study objective: To determine the prevalence of positive results for methacholine challenge tests in asymptomatic Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) cadets with no history of asthma. Design: Prospective, blinded cohort comparison study. Setting: Pulmonary diseases clinic in a US Army tertiary-care medical center. Patients: One hundred three college students who were undergoing a physical examination before entering active duty. Group 1 subjects, 58 men and 5 women with an average age of 22.7 years, had no symptoms or personal history of asthma. Group 2 patients, 34 men and 6 women with an average age of 22.2 years, had a history or recent suggestive symptoms of asthma. Interventions: Methacholine challenge testing using concentrations of 0.025, 0.25, 2.5, 10, and 25 mg/mL for a total dose of 188 inhalation units or until FEV1 had declined by 20%. Results: Group 2 had significantly more patients with positive results for methacholine challenge tests or reversible airflow obstruction at baseline (23 of 40 patients [57.5%]) than group 1 (8 of 63 patients [12.7%]; p < 0.05). The cadets in group 1 with positive results for methacholine challenge tests reacted with a 20% decline in FEV1 at the following concentrations: 25 mg/mL (188 IU), 2 patients; 10 mg/mL (64 IU), 4 patients; and 2.5 mg/mL (13.8 IU), 2 patients. Using values calculated for the provocative concentration of a substance causing a 20% fall in FEV1 and the new American Thoracic Society criteria, four patients would have borderline bronchial hyperresponsiveness (4 to 16 mg/mL) and three patients (4.8%) would have mild bronchial hyperresponsiveness (1 to 4 mg/mL). Conclusions: Asymptomatic US Army ROTC cadets with no history of asthma have possible false-positive responses to methacholine at concentrations > 0.25 mg/mL.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)701-707
Number of pages7
JournalCHEST
Volume119
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2001

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Methacholine Chloride
Asthma
Tertiary Care Centers
Inhalation
Lung Diseases
Physical Examination
Cohort Studies
History
Students

Keywords

  • Airway challenge testing
  • Airways hyperresponsiveness
  • Asthma
  • Methacholine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Methacholine challenge testing in Reserve Officer Training Corps cadets. / Roth, Bernard J.; Hammers, Lynn M.; Dillard, Thomas A.

In: CHEST, Vol. 119, No. 3, 03.2001, p. 701-707.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roth, BJ, Hammers, LM & Dillard, TA 2001, 'Methacholine challenge testing in Reserve Officer Training Corps cadets', CHEST, vol. 119, no. 3, pp. 701-707. https://doi.org/10.1378/chest.119.3.701
Roth, Bernard J. ; Hammers, Lynn M. ; Dillard, Thomas A. / Methacholine challenge testing in Reserve Officer Training Corps cadets. In: CHEST. 2001 ; Vol. 119, No. 3. pp. 701-707.
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abstract = "Study objective: To determine the prevalence of positive results for methacholine challenge tests in asymptomatic Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) cadets with no history of asthma. Design: Prospective, blinded cohort comparison study. Setting: Pulmonary diseases clinic in a US Army tertiary-care medical center. Patients: One hundred three college students who were undergoing a physical examination before entering active duty. Group 1 subjects, 58 men and 5 women with an average age of 22.7 years, had no symptoms or personal history of asthma. Group 2 patients, 34 men and 6 women with an average age of 22.2 years, had a history or recent suggestive symptoms of asthma. Interventions: Methacholine challenge testing using concentrations of 0.025, 0.25, 2.5, 10, and 25 mg/mL for a total dose of 188 inhalation units or until FEV1 had declined by 20{\%}. Results: Group 2 had significantly more patients with positive results for methacholine challenge tests or reversible airflow obstruction at baseline (23 of 40 patients [57.5{\%}]) than group 1 (8 of 63 patients [12.7{\%}]; p < 0.05). The cadets in group 1 with positive results for methacholine challenge tests reacted with a 20{\%} decline in FEV1 at the following concentrations: 25 mg/mL (188 IU), 2 patients; 10 mg/mL (64 IU), 4 patients; and 2.5 mg/mL (13.8 IU), 2 patients. Using values calculated for the provocative concentration of a substance causing a 20{\%} fall in FEV1 and the new American Thoracic Society criteria, four patients would have borderline bronchial hyperresponsiveness (4 to 16 mg/mL) and three patients (4.8{\%}) would have mild bronchial hyperresponsiveness (1 to 4 mg/mL). Conclusions: Asymptomatic US Army ROTC cadets with no history of asthma have possible false-positive responses to methacholine at concentrations > 0.25 mg/mL.",
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