Mimicking the effects of spaceflight on bone: Combined effects of disuse and chronic low-dose rate radiation exposure on bone mass in mice

Kanglun Yu, Alison H. Doherty, Paula C. Genik, Sara E. Gookin, Danielle M. Roteliuk, Samantha J. Wojda, Zhi Sheng Jiang, Meghan Elizabeth McGee Lawrence, Michael M. Weil, Seth W. Donahue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During spaceflight, crewmembers are subjected to biomechanical and biological challenges including microgravity and radiation. In the skeleton, spaceflight leads to bone loss, increasing the risk of fracture. Studies utilizing hindlimb suspension (HLS) as a ground-based model of spaceflight often neglect the concomitant effects of radiation exposure, and even when radiation is accounted for, it is often delivered at a high-dose rate over a very short period of time, which does not faithfully mimic spaceflight conditions. This study was designed to investigate the skeletal effects of low-dose rate gamma irradiation (8.5 cGy gamma radiation per day for 20 days, amounting to a total dose of 1.7 Gy) when administered simultaneously to disuse from HLS. The goal was to determine whether continuous, low-dose rate radiation administered during disuse would exacerbate bone loss in a murine HLS model. Four groups of 16 week old female C57BL/6 mice were studied: weight bearing + no radiation (WB+NR), HLS + NR, WB + radiation exposure (WB+RAD), and HLS+RAD. Surprisingly, although HLS led to cortical and trabecular bone loss, concurrent radiation exposure did not exacerbate these effects. Our results raise the possibility that mechanical unloading has larger effects on the bone loss that occurs during spaceflight than low-dose rate radiation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)62-68
Number of pages7
JournalLife Sciences in Space Research
Volume15
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

Fingerprint

hindlimb suspension
Hindlimb Suspension
Space Flight
radiation exposure
radiation dosage
bones
mice
bone
Bone and Bones
dosage
Radiation
radiation
Weightlessness
unloading
Gamma Rays
skeleton
Weight-Bearing
microgravity
Inbred C57BL Mouse
musculoskeletal system

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiation
  • Ecology
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Mimicking the effects of spaceflight on bone : Combined effects of disuse and chronic low-dose rate radiation exposure on bone mass in mice. / Yu, Kanglun; Doherty, Alison H.; Genik, Paula C.; Gookin, Sara E.; Roteliuk, Danielle M.; Wojda, Samantha J.; Jiang, Zhi Sheng; McGee Lawrence, Meghan Elizabeth; Weil, Michael M.; Donahue, Seth W.

In: Life Sciences in Space Research, Vol. 15, 01.11.2017, p. 62-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yu, Kanglun ; Doherty, Alison H. ; Genik, Paula C. ; Gookin, Sara E. ; Roteliuk, Danielle M. ; Wojda, Samantha J. ; Jiang, Zhi Sheng ; McGee Lawrence, Meghan Elizabeth ; Weil, Michael M. ; Donahue, Seth W. / Mimicking the effects of spaceflight on bone : Combined effects of disuse and chronic low-dose rate radiation exposure on bone mass in mice. In: Life Sciences in Space Research. 2017 ; Vol. 15. pp. 62-68.
@article{24532717010547d29f8dc7c1adb5a417,
title = "Mimicking the effects of spaceflight on bone: Combined effects of disuse and chronic low-dose rate radiation exposure on bone mass in mice",
abstract = "During spaceflight, crewmembers are subjected to biomechanical and biological challenges including microgravity and radiation. In the skeleton, spaceflight leads to bone loss, increasing the risk of fracture. Studies utilizing hindlimb suspension (HLS) as a ground-based model of spaceflight often neglect the concomitant effects of radiation exposure, and even when radiation is accounted for, it is often delivered at a high-dose rate over a very short period of time, which does not faithfully mimic spaceflight conditions. This study was designed to investigate the skeletal effects of low-dose rate gamma irradiation (8.5 cGy gamma radiation per day for 20 days, amounting to a total dose of 1.7 Gy) when administered simultaneously to disuse from HLS. The goal was to determine whether continuous, low-dose rate radiation administered during disuse would exacerbate bone loss in a murine HLS model. Four groups of 16 week old female C57BL/6 mice were studied: weight bearing + no radiation (WB+NR), HLS + NR, WB + radiation exposure (WB+RAD), and HLS+RAD. Surprisingly, although HLS led to cortical and trabecular bone loss, concurrent radiation exposure did not exacerbate these effects. Our results raise the possibility that mechanical unloading has larger effects on the bone loss that occurs during spaceflight than low-dose rate radiation.",
author = "Kanglun Yu and Doherty, {Alison H.} and Genik, {Paula C.} and Gookin, {Sara E.} and Roteliuk, {Danielle M.} and Wojda, {Samantha J.} and Jiang, {Zhi Sheng} and {McGee Lawrence}, {Meghan Elizabeth} and Weil, {Michael M.} and Donahue, {Seth W.}",
year = "2017",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.lssr.2017.08.004",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
pages = "62--68",
journal = "Life Sciences in Space Research",
issn = "2214-5524",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mimicking the effects of spaceflight on bone

T2 - Combined effects of disuse and chronic low-dose rate radiation exposure on bone mass in mice

AU - Yu, Kanglun

AU - Doherty, Alison H.

AU - Genik, Paula C.

AU - Gookin, Sara E.

AU - Roteliuk, Danielle M.

AU - Wojda, Samantha J.

AU - Jiang, Zhi Sheng

AU - McGee Lawrence, Meghan Elizabeth

AU - Weil, Michael M.

AU - Donahue, Seth W.

PY - 2017/11/1

Y1 - 2017/11/1

N2 - During spaceflight, crewmembers are subjected to biomechanical and biological challenges including microgravity and radiation. In the skeleton, spaceflight leads to bone loss, increasing the risk of fracture. Studies utilizing hindlimb suspension (HLS) as a ground-based model of spaceflight often neglect the concomitant effects of radiation exposure, and even when radiation is accounted for, it is often delivered at a high-dose rate over a very short period of time, which does not faithfully mimic spaceflight conditions. This study was designed to investigate the skeletal effects of low-dose rate gamma irradiation (8.5 cGy gamma radiation per day for 20 days, amounting to a total dose of 1.7 Gy) when administered simultaneously to disuse from HLS. The goal was to determine whether continuous, low-dose rate radiation administered during disuse would exacerbate bone loss in a murine HLS model. Four groups of 16 week old female C57BL/6 mice were studied: weight bearing + no radiation (WB+NR), HLS + NR, WB + radiation exposure (WB+RAD), and HLS+RAD. Surprisingly, although HLS led to cortical and trabecular bone loss, concurrent radiation exposure did not exacerbate these effects. Our results raise the possibility that mechanical unloading has larger effects on the bone loss that occurs during spaceflight than low-dose rate radiation.

AB - During spaceflight, crewmembers are subjected to biomechanical and biological challenges including microgravity and radiation. In the skeleton, spaceflight leads to bone loss, increasing the risk of fracture. Studies utilizing hindlimb suspension (HLS) as a ground-based model of spaceflight often neglect the concomitant effects of radiation exposure, and even when radiation is accounted for, it is often delivered at a high-dose rate over a very short period of time, which does not faithfully mimic spaceflight conditions. This study was designed to investigate the skeletal effects of low-dose rate gamma irradiation (8.5 cGy gamma radiation per day for 20 days, amounting to a total dose of 1.7 Gy) when administered simultaneously to disuse from HLS. The goal was to determine whether continuous, low-dose rate radiation administered during disuse would exacerbate bone loss in a murine HLS model. Four groups of 16 week old female C57BL/6 mice were studied: weight bearing + no radiation (WB+NR), HLS + NR, WB + radiation exposure (WB+RAD), and HLS+RAD. Surprisingly, although HLS led to cortical and trabecular bone loss, concurrent radiation exposure did not exacerbate these effects. Our results raise the possibility that mechanical unloading has larger effects on the bone loss that occurs during spaceflight than low-dose rate radiation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85027515020&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85027515020&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.lssr.2017.08.004

DO - 10.1016/j.lssr.2017.08.004

M3 - Article

C2 - 29198315

AN - SCOPUS:85027515020

VL - 15

SP - 62

EP - 68

JO - Life Sciences in Space Research

JF - Life Sciences in Space Research

SN - 2214-5524

ER -