Mini-micro-mainframe computer marriage: Combining technologies in a radiology results reporting system

George David, Scott Gregory

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The minicomputer-based information system in the Department of Radiology at the Medical College of Georgia Hospital and Clinics was placed in service in February, 1982. This system represents a sizable investment in minicomputer hardware in addition to more than 6 years of software customization. One serious deficiency in the original system was the lack of a radiology results reporting facility. Several options were considered to provide the department with this capability. The most obvious option was retiring the existing system and replacing it with one of a number of commercial products already offering results reporting. In-house development of a reporting facility lent itself more readily to microcomputers than to the existing minicomputer system. Due to system customization, economic and time constraints, it was decided to merge an in-house developed microcomputer-based report module into our existing minicomputer system. The minicomputer was able to communicate with and transfer files to and from both micro and mainframe systems. Combining technologies allowed us to continue taking advantage of our sizable investment in money, time, and customization while providing a microcomputer-based report module. Radiology reports are now typed on microcomputer word processors and bulk transferred to the minicomputer. The minicomputer provides access to both unapproved and approved reports on system terminals throughout the department. It also enhances reports by merging patient demographics and registration information. Using existing communications facilities to the hospital mainframe system, reports are provided throughout the institution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-30
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Digital Imaging
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 1989

Fingerprint

Mainframe Computers
Minicomputers
Radiology
Marriage
Computer systems
Technology
Microcomputers
Merging
Information Systems
Computer hardware
Information systems
Software
Communication
Economics
Demography

Keywords

  • Radiology
  • computers
  • microcomputers
  • minicomputers
  • radiology information systems
  • radiology reports

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition

Cite this

Mini-micro-mainframe computer marriage : Combining technologies in a radiology results reporting system. / David, George; Gregory, Scott.

In: Journal of Digital Imaging, Vol. 2, No. 1, 01.02.1989, p. 27-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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