Mode of drinking fluoridated milk

effect on intraoral fluoride concentrations

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To determine the effect of the mode of drinking fluoridated milk on salivary and plaque fluoride concentrations. Methods: Fluoridated milk was ingested by 32 children in three ways: (a) directly from the container (1.0 and 5.0 mg F/litre), (b) through a straw with the tip between the lips (5.0 mg F/litre), and (c) with the tip deep in the oral cavity (5.0 mg F/litre). Saliva was collected at baseline and 2, 15, and 40 min and plaque at baseline and 20 min after drinking. Fluoride concentrations were determined using the electrode after HMDS-facilitated diffusion. Results: The mode of drinking did not affect fluoride concentrations in saliva or plaque. The average 2-min salivary concentrations were 65 ng F/mL for the 1.0 mg F/litre group and 276 ng F/mL for the three 5.0 mg F/litre groups (P < 0.01). The average of the 15- and 40-min salivary concentrations was 22 ng F/mL for the 1.0 mg F/litre group and 41 ng F/mL for the 5.0 mg F/litre groups (P < 0.01). Plaque concentrations showed the same patterns as in saliva, that is, they were higher in the three 5.0 mg F/litre groups than in the 1.0 mg F/litre group and the differences among the 5.0 mg F/litre groups were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Salivary and plaque fluoride concentrations were independent of the mode of drinking but directly related to milk fluoride concentrations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)457-462
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Paediatric Dentistry
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

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Fluorides
Drinking
Milk
Saliva
Facilitated Diffusion
Lip
Mouth
Electrodes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

@article{b6083c1d20e34caaa92df34db0c941bd,
title = "Mode of drinking fluoridated milk: effect on intraoral fluoride concentrations",
abstract = "Objective: To determine the effect of the mode of drinking fluoridated milk on salivary and plaque fluoride concentrations. Methods: Fluoridated milk was ingested by 32 children in three ways: (a) directly from the container (1.0 and 5.0 mg F/litre), (b) through a straw with the tip between the lips (5.0 mg F/litre), and (c) with the tip deep in the oral cavity (5.0 mg F/litre). Saliva was collected at baseline and 2, 15, and 40 min and plaque at baseline and 20 min after drinking. Fluoride concentrations were determined using the electrode after HMDS-facilitated diffusion. Results: The mode of drinking did not affect fluoride concentrations in saliva or plaque. The average 2-min salivary concentrations were 65 ng F/mL for the 1.0 mg F/litre group and 276 ng F/mL for the three 5.0 mg F/litre groups (P < 0.01). The average of the 15- and 40-min salivary concentrations was 22 ng F/mL for the 1.0 mg F/litre group and 41 ng F/mL for the 5.0 mg F/litre groups (P < 0.01). Plaque concentrations showed the same patterns as in saliva, that is, they were higher in the three 5.0 mg F/litre groups than in the 1.0 mg F/litre group and the differences among the 5.0 mg F/litre groups were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Salivary and plaque fluoride concentrations were independent of the mode of drinking but directly related to milk fluoride concentrations.",
author = "Whitford, {Gary M.} and Riley, {Danielle V.} and Schafer, {Tara E} and Looney, {Stephen Warwick}",
year = "2016",
month = "11",
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language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "457--462",
journal = "International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry",
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T1 - Mode of drinking fluoridated milk

T2 - effect on intraoral fluoride concentrations

AU - Whitford, Gary M.

AU - Riley, Danielle V.

AU - Schafer, Tara E

AU - Looney, Stephen Warwick

PY - 2016/11/1

Y1 - 2016/11/1

N2 - Objective: To determine the effect of the mode of drinking fluoridated milk on salivary and plaque fluoride concentrations. Methods: Fluoridated milk was ingested by 32 children in three ways: (a) directly from the container (1.0 and 5.0 mg F/litre), (b) through a straw with the tip between the lips (5.0 mg F/litre), and (c) with the tip deep in the oral cavity (5.0 mg F/litre). Saliva was collected at baseline and 2, 15, and 40 min and plaque at baseline and 20 min after drinking. Fluoride concentrations were determined using the electrode after HMDS-facilitated diffusion. Results: The mode of drinking did not affect fluoride concentrations in saliva or plaque. The average 2-min salivary concentrations were 65 ng F/mL for the 1.0 mg F/litre group and 276 ng F/mL for the three 5.0 mg F/litre groups (P < 0.01). The average of the 15- and 40-min salivary concentrations was 22 ng F/mL for the 1.0 mg F/litre group and 41 ng F/mL for the 5.0 mg F/litre groups (P < 0.01). Plaque concentrations showed the same patterns as in saliva, that is, they were higher in the three 5.0 mg F/litre groups than in the 1.0 mg F/litre group and the differences among the 5.0 mg F/litre groups were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Salivary and plaque fluoride concentrations were independent of the mode of drinking but directly related to milk fluoride concentrations.

AB - Objective: To determine the effect of the mode of drinking fluoridated milk on salivary and plaque fluoride concentrations. Methods: Fluoridated milk was ingested by 32 children in three ways: (a) directly from the container (1.0 and 5.0 mg F/litre), (b) through a straw with the tip between the lips (5.0 mg F/litre), and (c) with the tip deep in the oral cavity (5.0 mg F/litre). Saliva was collected at baseline and 2, 15, and 40 min and plaque at baseline and 20 min after drinking. Fluoride concentrations were determined using the electrode after HMDS-facilitated diffusion. Results: The mode of drinking did not affect fluoride concentrations in saliva or plaque. The average 2-min salivary concentrations were 65 ng F/mL for the 1.0 mg F/litre group and 276 ng F/mL for the three 5.0 mg F/litre groups (P < 0.01). The average of the 15- and 40-min salivary concentrations was 22 ng F/mL for the 1.0 mg F/litre group and 41 ng F/mL for the 5.0 mg F/litre groups (P < 0.01). Plaque concentrations showed the same patterns as in saliva, that is, they were higher in the three 5.0 mg F/litre groups than in the 1.0 mg F/litre group and the differences among the 5.0 mg F/litre groups were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Salivary and plaque fluoride concentrations were independent of the mode of drinking but directly related to milk fluoride concentrations.

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