Modulation of feeding by β2-microglobulin, a marker of immune activation

C. R. Plata-Salaman, G. Sonti, J. P. Borkoski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increased levels of β2-microglobulin (part of the class I major histocompatibility complex molecules) in body fluids are associated with activation of the immune system and pathophysiological processes. Various anorexigenic cytokines, including interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor- α, induce the expression of class I molecules. Therefore, it is possible that β2-microglobulin may participate in the feeding suppression induced by cytokines or may have direct effects on feeding. In the present study, the effects of β2-microglobulin on the central regulation of feeding were investigated. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) microinfusion of β2- microglobulin (0.01-5.0 μg/rat) suppressed the nighttime food intake dose dependently. The most effective dose of β2-microglobulin, 5.0 μg/rat, decreased nighttime feeding by 38% and total daily food intake by 28%. Computerized analysis of behavioral patterns demonstrated that β2- microglobulin decreased meal size and meal frequency during the initial 4-h interval, but decreased only meal size during the second 4-h interval after the ICV microinfusion of 5.0 μg β2-microglobulin/rat; meal duration was not significantly affected in any interval. For the complete nighttime period, only meal size was significantly decreased. Cerebrospinal fluid- brain and rectal temperatures did not change significantly. ICV microinfusion of heat-treated β2-microglobulin or intraperitoneal administration of β2- microglobulin, in doses equivalent to those administered centrally, had no effect on food intake. The results suggest that β2-microglobulin may act centrally to decrease feeding, and this effect may participate in the anorexia frequently accompanying pathological processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume268
Issue number6 37-6
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

portion size
Meals
food intake
Biomarkers
rats
cytokines
dosage
Eating
tumor necrosis factors
body fluids
major histocompatibility complex
Immune System Phenomena
cerebrospinal fluid
interferons
intraperitoneal injection
anorexia
immune system
Cytokines
brain
heat

Keywords

  • behavior
  • cerebrospinal fluid
  • cytokine
  • feeding and drinking
  • food and water
  • growth factor
  • immune system
  • immunomodulator
  • intake
  • intracerebroventricular administration
  • nervous system
  • neuroimmunology
  • rat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Modulation of feeding by β2-microglobulin, a marker of immune activation. / Plata-Salaman, C. R.; Sonti, G.; Borkoski, J. P.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 268, No. 6 37-6, 1995.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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