More than 150 consecutive open umbilical hernia repairs in a major Veterans Administration Medical Center

Buckminster Farrow, Samir Awad, David H. Berger, Daniel Albo, Liz Lee, Anu Subramanian, Charles F. Bellows

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of surgical site infection for open elective umbilical hernia repairs and to identify the factors related to an increased risk of infection and/or recurrence. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 152 open elective umbilical hernia repairs between 2003 and 2007 was performed. Results: Overall, 19% of repairs became infected. Both high ASA classification (P = .01) and mesh repair (P = .01) significantly predicted wound infection, whereas age >60 years, body mass index >30, smoking, immunosuppression, diabetes, and hernia size did not. Only 2 of 17 infected mesh repairs required removal of the mesh. The recurrence rate was 1.5% for mesh and 9.2% for suture repairs. Conclusions: Umbilical hernia repair is associated with a high rate of infection, and most superficial mesh infections can be treated with antibiotics alone. In addition, mesh repair of umbilical hernias decreased the rate of recurrence but increased the risk of infection compared with suture repairs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)647-651
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume196
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Umbilical Hernia
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Herniorrhaphy
Infection
Recurrence
Sutures
Surgical Wound Infection
Wound Infection
Hernia
Immunosuppression
Body Mass Index
Smoking
Anti-Bacterial Agents

Keywords

  • Hernia recurrence
  • Mesh
  • Surgical site infection
  • Umbilical hernia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

More than 150 consecutive open umbilical hernia repairs in a major Veterans Administration Medical Center. / Farrow, Buckminster; Awad, Samir; Berger, David H.; Albo, Daniel; Lee, Liz; Subramanian, Anu; Bellows, Charles F.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 196, No. 5, 01.11.2008, p. 647-651.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Farrow, Buckminster ; Awad, Samir ; Berger, David H. ; Albo, Daniel ; Lee, Liz ; Subramanian, Anu ; Bellows, Charles F. / More than 150 consecutive open umbilical hernia repairs in a major Veterans Administration Medical Center. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2008 ; Vol. 196, No. 5. pp. 647-651.
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