Mortality in levodopa-treated Parkinson's disease

John C. Morgan, Lillian J. Currie, Madaline B. Harrison, James P. Bennett, Joel M. Trugman, G. Frederick Wooten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with increased mortality despite many advances in treatment. Following the introduction of levodopa in the late 1960's, many studies reported improved or normalized mortality rates in PD. Despite the remarkable symptomatic benefits provided by levodopa, multiple recent studies have demonstrated that PD patients continue to die at a rate in excess of their peers. We undertook this retrospective study of 211 deceased PD patients to determine the factors associated with mortality in levodopa-treated PD. Our findings confirm that PD is associated with increased mortality in both men and women. Unlike the majority of other mortality studies, we found that women have a greater reduction in lifespan compared to men. We also found that patients with early onset PD (onset at the age of 50 or before) have reduced survival relative to PD patients with later ages of onset. A final important finding is that survival is equal in PD patients treated with levodopa early (within 2 years or less of PD onset) versus later.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number426976
JournalParkinson's Disease
Volume2014
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 6 2014

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Levodopa
Parkinson Disease
Mortality
Survival
Age of Onset
Retrospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Morgan, J. C., Currie, L. J., Harrison, M. B., Bennett, J. P., Trugman, J. M., & Wooten, G. F. (2014). Mortality in levodopa-treated Parkinson's disease. Parkinson's Disease, 2014, [426976]. https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/426976

Mortality in levodopa-treated Parkinson's disease. / Morgan, John C.; Currie, Lillian J.; Harrison, Madaline B.; Bennett, James P.; Trugman, Joel M.; Wooten, G. Frederick.

In: Parkinson's Disease, Vol. 2014, 426976, 06.03.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morgan, JC, Currie, LJ, Harrison, MB, Bennett, JP, Trugman, JM & Wooten, GF 2014, 'Mortality in levodopa-treated Parkinson's disease', Parkinson's Disease, vol. 2014, 426976. https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/426976
Morgan JC, Currie LJ, Harrison MB, Bennett JP, Trugman JM, Wooten GF. Mortality in levodopa-treated Parkinson's disease. Parkinson's Disease. 2014 Mar 6;2014. 426976. https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/426976
Morgan, John C. ; Currie, Lillian J. ; Harrison, Madaline B. ; Bennett, James P. ; Trugman, Joel M. ; Wooten, G. Frederick. / Mortality in levodopa-treated Parkinson's disease. In: Parkinson's Disease. 2014 ; Vol. 2014.
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