Muscle-strengthening and aerobic activities and mortality among 3+ year cancer survivors in the U.S

Yelena N. Tarasenko, Daniel F Linder, Eric A. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study examined the association between adherence to American College of Sports Medicine and American Cancer Society guidelines on aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities and mortality risks among 3+ year cancer survivors in the U.S. Methods: The observational study was based on 1999–2009 National Health Interview Survey Linked Mortality Files with follow-up through 2011. After applying exclusion criteria, there were 13,997 observations. The hazard ratios (HRs) for meeting recommendations on muscle-strengthening activities only, on aerobic activities only, and on both types of physical activity (i.e., adhering to complete guidelines) were calculated using a reference group of cancer survivors engaging in neither. Unadjusted and adjusted HRs of all-cause, cancer-specific, and cardiovascular disease-specific mortalities were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: In all models, compared to the reference group, cancer survivors adhering to complete guidelines had significantly decreased all-cause, cancer-specific, and cardiovascular disease-specific mortalities (HRs ranged from 0.37 to 0.64, p’s < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between hazard rates of cancer survivors engaging in recommended levels of muscle-strengthening activities only and the reference group (HRs ranged from 0.76 to 0.94, p’s > 0.05). Wald test statistics suggested a significant dose–response relationship between levels of adherence to complete guidelines and cancer-specific mortality. Conclusions: While muscle-strengthening activities by themselves do not appear to reduce mortality risks, such activities may provide added cancer-specific survival benefits to 3+ year cancer survivors who are already aerobically active.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)475-484
Number of pages10
JournalCancer Causes and Control
Volume29
Issue number4-5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

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Survivors
Muscles
Mortality
Neoplasms
Guidelines
Cardiovascular Diseases
Health Surveys
Proportional Hazards Models
Observational Studies
Interviews
Exercise
Survival

Keywords

  • Cancer survivor
  • Exercise
  • Linked mortality files
  • Mortality
  • NHIS
  • Strength training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Muscle-strengthening and aerobic activities and mortality among 3+ year cancer survivors in the U.S. / Tarasenko, Yelena N.; Linder, Daniel F; Miller, Eric A.

In: Cancer Causes and Control, Vol. 29, No. 4-5, 01.05.2018, p. 475-484.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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