MuSK: A kinase critical for the formation and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction

Arnab Barik, Wen Cheng Xiong, Lin Mei

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) is a RTK that is specifically expressed in skeletal muscle fibers and critical for the formation and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), a peripheral synapse formed between motoneurons and muscle fibers (1, 2). The acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are concentrated at the crest of junctional folds on muscle fibers, critical for muscle contraction. Impaired NMJ formation or function in flicts muscular dystrophy. Being large and accessible, this peripheral synapse has served as a classic model of synapse function and synaptogenesis and has contributed a great deal to the understanding of molecular mechanisms of synapse formation in the brain. In this chapter, we will review the structures of MuSK in various vertebrates, its role in NMJ formation and maintenance, possible pathways that have been suggested by recent studies, and how MuSK may be a target in muscular dystrophy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNeuromethods
PublisherHumana Press Inc.
Pages203-217
Number of pages15
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameNeuromethods
Volume68
ISSN (Print)0893-2336
ISSN (Electronic)1940-6045

Keywords

  • AChR Pre-patterning
  • Agrin hypothesis
  • Juxtamembrane domain
  • Lrp4
  • MASC
  • Neuromuscular junction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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  • Cite this

    Barik, A., Xiong, W. C., & Mei, L. (2012). MuSK: A kinase critical for the formation and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction. In Neuromethods (pp. 203-217). (Neuromethods; Vol. 68). Humana Press Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-61779-824-5_11