Neonatal mortality for very low birth weight deliveries in South Carolina by level of hospital perinatal service

M. K. Menard, Q. Liu, E. A. Holyten, W. M. Sappenfield, Lawrence D Devoe, J. W.C. Johnson, T. K. Young, R. V. Wade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether neonatal mortality rates for very low birth weight (500 to 1499 g) infants born in South Carolina differ by level of perinatal services available at the hospital of birth. STUDY DESIGN: Linked live birth certificates and infant death certificates for 1993 through 1995 were used. Birth weight-specific neonatal mortality rates among 2375 very low birth weight infants were estimated and analyzed by race and by level of perinatal services at the hospital of birth. Rates were compared with χ2 analysis. RESULTS: Seventy- eight percent of very low birth weight deliveries occurred in level III hospitals. The overall neonatal mortality rate was 178 deaths/1000 very low birth weight live births. Neonatal mortality rates, adjusted for birth weight and race, were significantly higher (P < .05) for infants born in level I hospitals (267 deaths/1000 live births), all level II hospitals (232 deaths/1000 live births), and level II hospitals with neonatologists (213 deaths/1000 live births) than for infants born in level III centers (146 deaths/1000 live births). CONCLUSION: Very low birth weight infants are more likely to survive if born in level III hospitals than in level I or II facilities, with or without neonatologists. Obstetric providers should support public health efforts and perinatal health systems to ensure that all women have access to a strong system of risk-appropriate perinatal care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)374-381
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume179
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Very Low Birth Weight Infant
Infant Mortality
Live Birth
Mortality
Birth Weight
Parturition
Perinatal Care
Birth Certificates
Death Certificates
Obstetrics
Public Health
Health

Keywords

  • Infant mortality
  • Neonatal intensive care
  • Outcome and process assessment (health care)
  • Prematurity
  • Regionalization of perinatal care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Neonatal mortality for very low birth weight deliveries in South Carolina by level of hospital perinatal service. / Menard, M. K.; Liu, Q.; Holyten, E. A.; Sappenfield, W. M.; Devoe, Lawrence D; Johnson, J. W.C.; Young, T. K.; Wade, R. V.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 179, No. 2, 01.01.1998, p. 374-381.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Menard, M. K. ; Liu, Q. ; Holyten, E. A. ; Sappenfield, W. M. ; Devoe, Lawrence D ; Johnson, J. W.C. ; Young, T. K. ; Wade, R. V. / Neonatal mortality for very low birth weight deliveries in South Carolina by level of hospital perinatal service. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1998 ; Vol. 179, No. 2. pp. 374-381.
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