Neurocognitive and behavioral profiles of children with Landau-Kleffner syndrome

Cynthia A. Riccio, Stephanie M. Vidrine, Morris J. Cohen, Delmaris Acosta-Cotte, Yong D Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This is a retrospective study of 14 cases of children with Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS), the most prominent feature of which is acquired aphasia. These children were followed at a tertiary care pediatric epilepsy center. From the research data base, all LKS cases with neuropsychological evaluation were extracted. Children ranged in age from 6 to 13 years (M = 9.12; SD = 2.19) at the time of assessment (1 to 10 years post-onset). The majority of the children were white males, and all but one continued to experience seizure activity. Global intellectual functioning ranged from 59 to 101 (M = 82.07; SD = 12.14). Across the 14 cases reviewed, the neuropsychological profiles are considered in the context of neurological and syndrome-related factors. For these cases, 86% demonstrated continued expressive, and 50% had receptive language problems with 57% exhibiting poor auditory processing. Furthermore, 50 to 57% had deficits in auditory working memory and verbal memory. Academically, the majority had poor reading fluency and comprehension; 50% exhibited difficulty with mathematics. Finally, 57% evidenced attentional or other behavioral problems. Better understanding of LKS can assist in targeted assessment and intervention planning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)345-354
Number of pages10
JournalApplied Neuropsychology: Child
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2017

Fingerprint

Landau-Kleffner Syndrome
Mathematics
Aphasia
Tertiary Healthcare
Short-Term Memory
Reading
Epilepsy
Seizures
Language
Retrospective Studies
Databases
Pediatrics
Research

Keywords

  • Aphasia
  • Landau-Kleffner syndrome
  • epilepsy
  • inattention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Neurocognitive and behavioral profiles of children with Landau-Kleffner syndrome. / Riccio, Cynthia A.; Vidrine, Stephanie M.; Cohen, Morris J.; Acosta-Cotte, Delmaris; Park, Yong D.

In: Applied Neuropsychology: Child, Vol. 6, No. 4, 02.10.2017, p. 345-354.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Riccio, Cynthia A. ; Vidrine, Stephanie M. ; Cohen, Morris J. ; Acosta-Cotte, Delmaris ; Park, Yong D. / Neurocognitive and behavioral profiles of children with Landau-Kleffner syndrome. In: Applied Neuropsychology: Child. 2017 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 345-354.
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