Neurocognitive and psychosocial correlates of hostility among persons in a post-acute phase of schizophrenia spectrum disorders

Paul H. Lysaker, Dustin E. Wright, Catherine A. Clements, Cynthia D. Plascak-Hallberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Persons with schizophrenia often have difficulty inhibiting hostile behaviors. While the correlates of hostility have been extensively explored in controlled settings, less is known about hostile behaviors and attitudes among outpatients who are in a post-acute phase of illness. Accordingly, this study examined the relationship of self-reported hostile behaviors and attitudes with measures of neurocognition, childhood physical abuse and hopelessness among 36 individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. In a stepwise multiple regression, poorer executive function and a history of childhood physical abuse significantly predicted behavioral hostility (R2 = .25, P < .05), while attitudinal hostility was uniquely predicted by hopelessness (R2 = .16, P < .05). Results suggest that behavioral hostility among persons in a stable phase of illness may be closely related to disinhibition and trauma history while hostile attitudes may be more closely linked with attitudes about current psychosocial circumstances.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-324
Number of pages6
JournalComprehensive Psychiatry
Volume43
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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