Nicotine patch vs. nicotine lozenge for smoking cessation: An effectiveness trial coordinated by the Community Clinical Oncology Program

Robert A. Schnoll, Elisa Martinez, Kristina L. Tatum, Marcella Glass, Albert Bernath, Daron Gale Ferris, Patrick Reynolds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Nicotine replacement therapies are efficacious for treating nicotine dependence. However, limited data exist on benefits of different NRTs and predictors of treatment outcome. This study compared the effectiveness of transdermal nicotine vs. nicotine lozenge for smoking cessation and identified predictors of treatment response. Methods: A randomized, open-label effectiveness trial was conducted at 12 medical sites participating in the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program. The sample consisted of 642 treatment-seeking smokers randomized to 12 weeks of transdermal nicotine or nicotine lozenge. Results: Smoker characteristics were assessed at baseline, and 24-h point prevalence abstinence confirmed with breath carbon monoxide (CO) was evaluated at end of treatment (EOT) and at a 6-month follow-up. There was a trend for higher quit rates for transdermal nicotine vs. nicotine lozenge at EOT (24.3% vs. 18.7%, p=.10) and 6 months (15.6% vs. 10.9%, p=.10). A logistic regression model of EOT quit rates showed smokers who preferred transdermal nicotine, were not reactive to smoking cues, and did not use nicotine to alleviate distress or stimulate cognitive function had higher quit rates on transdermal nicotine. A logistic regression model of 6-month quit rates showed smokers who preferred transdermal nicotine had higher quit rates on transdermal nicotine, and smokers who used nicotine to alleviate distress or stimulate cognitive processes had lower quit rates on nicotine lozenge. Conclusions: Transdermal nicotine may be more effective than nicotine lozenge for smokers who prefer transdermal nicotine and do not smoke to alleviate emotional distress or stimulate cognitive function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)237-243
Number of pages7
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume107
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

Fingerprint

Tobacco Use Cessation Products
Oncology
Medical Oncology
Smoking Cessation
Nicotine
Logistic Models
Cognition
Logistics
Tobacco Use Disorder
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Carbon Monoxide
Smoke
Cues

Keywords

  • Moderators
  • Nicotine dependence
  • Nicotine replacement therapy
  • Smoking cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Nicotine patch vs. nicotine lozenge for smoking cessation : An effectiveness trial coordinated by the Community Clinical Oncology Program. / Schnoll, Robert A.; Martinez, Elisa; Tatum, Kristina L.; Glass, Marcella; Bernath, Albert; Ferris, Daron Gale; Reynolds, Patrick.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 107, No. 2-3, 01.03.2010, p. 237-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schnoll, Robert A. ; Martinez, Elisa ; Tatum, Kristina L. ; Glass, Marcella ; Bernath, Albert ; Ferris, Daron Gale ; Reynolds, Patrick. / Nicotine patch vs. nicotine lozenge for smoking cessation : An effectiveness trial coordinated by the Community Clinical Oncology Program. In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2010 ; Vol. 107, No. 2-3. pp. 237-243.
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