Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and genomic DNA methylation in blood

Lauren E. Wilson, Sangmi Kim, Zongli Xu, Sophia Harlid, Dale P. Sandler, Jack A. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use is associated with decreased risk of some cancers. NSAID use modulates the epigenetic profile of normal colonic epithelium and may reduce risk of colon cancer through this pathway; however, the effect of NSAID use on the DNA methylation profile of other tissues including whole blood has not yet been examined. Findings Using the Sister Study cohort, we examined the association between NSAID usage and whole genome methylation patterns in blood DNA. Blood DNA methylation status across 27,589 CpG sites was evaluated for 871 women using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 Beadchip, and in a non-overlapping replication sample of 187 women at 485,512 CpG sites using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchip. We identified a number of CpG sites that were differentially methylated in regular, long-term users of NSAIDs in the discovery group, but none of these sites were statistically significant in our replication group. Conclusions We found no replicable methylation differences in blood related to NSAID usage. If NSAID use does effect blood DNA methylation patterns, differences are likely small.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0138920
JournalPLoS One
Volume10
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 22 2015

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nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents
DNA methylation
DNA Methylation
Blood
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
genomics
blood
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Methylation
methylation
Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Epigenomics
risk reduction
Colonic Neoplasms
Siblings
colorectal neoplasms
cohort studies
epigenetics
Cohort Studies
Epithelium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Wilson, L. E., Kim, S., Xu, Z., Harlid, S., Sandler, D. P., & Taylor, J. A. (2015). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and genomic DNA methylation in blood. PLoS One, 10(9), [e0138920]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0138920

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and genomic DNA methylation in blood. / Wilson, Lauren E.; Kim, Sangmi; Xu, Zongli; Harlid, Sophia; Sandler, Dale P.; Taylor, Jack A.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 10, No. 9, e0138920, 22.09.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wilson, LE, Kim, S, Xu, Z, Harlid, S, Sandler, DP & Taylor, JA 2015, 'Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and genomic DNA methylation in blood', PLoS One, vol. 10, no. 9, e0138920. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0138920
Wilson LE, Kim S, Xu Z, Harlid S, Sandler DP, Taylor JA. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and genomic DNA methylation in blood. PLoS One. 2015 Sep 22;10(9). e0138920. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0138920
Wilson, Lauren E. ; Kim, Sangmi ; Xu, Zongli ; Harlid, Sophia ; Sandler, Dale P. ; Taylor, Jack A. / Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and genomic DNA methylation in blood. In: PLoS One. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 9.
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