Obtaining DNA from a geographically dispersed cohort of current and former smokers: Use of mail-based mouthwash collection and monetary incentives

Joseph E. Bauer, Hamed Rezaishiraz, Karen Head, John Kenneth Cowell, Gerold Bepler, Miriam Aiken, K. Michael Cummings, Andrew Hyland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The feasibility of collecting DNA through the mail from a cohort of current and former smokers was assessed. Also examined was whether monetary incentives would increase response rates. A random sample of 300 subjects, stratified by 20 U.S. communities, was selected to participate. The sampling frame included the 6,726 people who were in both the Community Intervention Trial for Smoking Cessation (COMMIT) between 1988 and 1993 and the follow-up study in 2001, and who consented to being contacted again. Subjects were further randomized within communities to incentive arms of US$10, US$2, or US$0. A total of 110 usable samples were returned (37%), and the US$10 incentive arm had the highest response (43%). Logistic regression revealed no significant predictors of sending a DNA sample, although in a larger study, similar-sized odds ratios would be statistically significant for subjects who received the US$10 incentive and for those who were White, female, or college graduates or whose household incomes were more than US$60,000 per year. The spectrophotometer-determined median DNA yield was 44.93 μg (range=4.00-425.86 μg). Assuming that 50 ng of DNA would be needed for polymerase chain reaction amplification to determine any given genotype, 80-8,517 runs would be attainable. Qualitative findings suggest several methodological improvements to boost response rates. Institutional review board requirements, which are standardized on the inpatient, clinical protocol model, stipulated that noninstitutionally based subjects needed a witness to initial and date every page as well as sign the consent form. This pilot study showed that this requirement could pose some challenges in population-based research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)439-446
Number of pages8
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mouthwashes
Postal Service
Motivation
DNA
Consent Forms
Research Ethics Committees
Smoking Cessation
Clinical Protocols
Inpatients
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Genotype
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Research
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Obtaining DNA from a geographically dispersed cohort of current and former smokers : Use of mail-based mouthwash collection and monetary incentives. / Bauer, Joseph E.; Rezaishiraz, Hamed; Head, Karen; Cowell, John Kenneth; Bepler, Gerold; Aiken, Miriam; Cummings, K. Michael; Hyland, Andrew.

In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Vol. 6, No. 3, 01.06.2004, p. 439-446.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bauer, Joseph E. ; Rezaishiraz, Hamed ; Head, Karen ; Cowell, John Kenneth ; Bepler, Gerold ; Aiken, Miriam ; Cummings, K. Michael ; Hyland, Andrew. / Obtaining DNA from a geographically dispersed cohort of current and former smokers : Use of mail-based mouthwash collection and monetary incentives. In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research. 2004 ; Vol. 6, No. 3. pp. 439-446.
@article{ed9c40e35e514acc95c1bcb410184f29,
title = "Obtaining DNA from a geographically dispersed cohort of current and former smokers: Use of mail-based mouthwash collection and monetary incentives",
abstract = "The feasibility of collecting DNA through the mail from a cohort of current and former smokers was assessed. Also examined was whether monetary incentives would increase response rates. A random sample of 300 subjects, stratified by 20 U.S. communities, was selected to participate. The sampling frame included the 6,726 people who were in both the Community Intervention Trial for Smoking Cessation (COMMIT) between 1988 and 1993 and the follow-up study in 2001, and who consented to being contacted again. Subjects were further randomized within communities to incentive arms of US$10, US$2, or US$0. A total of 110 usable samples were returned (37{\%}), and the US$10 incentive arm had the highest response (43{\%}). Logistic regression revealed no significant predictors of sending a DNA sample, although in a larger study, similar-sized odds ratios would be statistically significant for subjects who received the US$10 incentive and for those who were White, female, or college graduates or whose household incomes were more than US$60,000 per year. The spectrophotometer-determined median DNA yield was 44.93 μg (range=4.00-425.86 μg). Assuming that 50 ng of DNA would be needed for polymerase chain reaction amplification to determine any given genotype, 80-8,517 runs would be attainable. Qualitative findings suggest several methodological improvements to boost response rates. Institutional review board requirements, which are standardized on the inpatient, clinical protocol model, stipulated that noninstitutionally based subjects needed a witness to initial and date every page as well as sign the consent form. This pilot study showed that this requirement could pose some challenges in population-based research.",
author = "Bauer, {Joseph E.} and Hamed Rezaishiraz and Karen Head and Cowell, {John Kenneth} and Gerold Bepler and Miriam Aiken and Cummings, {K. Michael} and Andrew Hyland",
year = "2004",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/14622200410001696583",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "439--446",
journal = "Nicotine and Tobacco Research",
issn = "1462-2203",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Obtaining DNA from a geographically dispersed cohort of current and former smokers

T2 - Use of mail-based mouthwash collection and monetary incentives

AU - Bauer, Joseph E.

AU - Rezaishiraz, Hamed

AU - Head, Karen

AU - Cowell, John Kenneth

AU - Bepler, Gerold

AU - Aiken, Miriam

AU - Cummings, K. Michael

AU - Hyland, Andrew

PY - 2004/6/1

Y1 - 2004/6/1

N2 - The feasibility of collecting DNA through the mail from a cohort of current and former smokers was assessed. Also examined was whether monetary incentives would increase response rates. A random sample of 300 subjects, stratified by 20 U.S. communities, was selected to participate. The sampling frame included the 6,726 people who were in both the Community Intervention Trial for Smoking Cessation (COMMIT) between 1988 and 1993 and the follow-up study in 2001, and who consented to being contacted again. Subjects were further randomized within communities to incentive arms of US$10, US$2, or US$0. A total of 110 usable samples were returned (37%), and the US$10 incentive arm had the highest response (43%). Logistic regression revealed no significant predictors of sending a DNA sample, although in a larger study, similar-sized odds ratios would be statistically significant for subjects who received the US$10 incentive and for those who were White, female, or college graduates or whose household incomes were more than US$60,000 per year. The spectrophotometer-determined median DNA yield was 44.93 μg (range=4.00-425.86 μg). Assuming that 50 ng of DNA would be needed for polymerase chain reaction amplification to determine any given genotype, 80-8,517 runs would be attainable. Qualitative findings suggest several methodological improvements to boost response rates. Institutional review board requirements, which are standardized on the inpatient, clinical protocol model, stipulated that noninstitutionally based subjects needed a witness to initial and date every page as well as sign the consent form. This pilot study showed that this requirement could pose some challenges in population-based research.

AB - The feasibility of collecting DNA through the mail from a cohort of current and former smokers was assessed. Also examined was whether monetary incentives would increase response rates. A random sample of 300 subjects, stratified by 20 U.S. communities, was selected to participate. The sampling frame included the 6,726 people who were in both the Community Intervention Trial for Smoking Cessation (COMMIT) between 1988 and 1993 and the follow-up study in 2001, and who consented to being contacted again. Subjects were further randomized within communities to incentive arms of US$10, US$2, or US$0. A total of 110 usable samples were returned (37%), and the US$10 incentive arm had the highest response (43%). Logistic regression revealed no significant predictors of sending a DNA sample, although in a larger study, similar-sized odds ratios would be statistically significant for subjects who received the US$10 incentive and for those who were White, female, or college graduates or whose household incomes were more than US$60,000 per year. The spectrophotometer-determined median DNA yield was 44.93 μg (range=4.00-425.86 μg). Assuming that 50 ng of DNA would be needed for polymerase chain reaction amplification to determine any given genotype, 80-8,517 runs would be attainable. Qualitative findings suggest several methodological improvements to boost response rates. Institutional review board requirements, which are standardized on the inpatient, clinical protocol model, stipulated that noninstitutionally based subjects needed a witness to initial and date every page as well as sign the consent form. This pilot study showed that this requirement could pose some challenges in population-based research.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=3242763815&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=3242763815&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/14622200410001696583

DO - 10.1080/14622200410001696583

M3 - Article

C2 - 15203777

AN - SCOPUS:3242763815

VL - 6

SP - 439

EP - 446

JO - Nicotine and Tobacco Research

JF - Nicotine and Tobacco Research

SN - 1462-2203

IS - 3

ER -