Operationalization of community-based participatory research principles: Assessment of the National Cancer Institute's Community Network Programs

Kathryn L. Braun, Tung T. Nguyen, Sora Park Tanjasiri, Janis Campbell, Sue P. Heiney, Heather M. Brandt, Selina A. Smith, Daniel S. Blumenthal, Margaret Hargreaves, Kathryn Coe, Grace X. Ma, Donna Kenerson, Kushal Patel, Joann Tsark, James R. Hébert

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. We examined how National Cancer Institute-funded Community Network Programs (CNPs) operationalized principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR). Methods. We reviewed the literature and extant CBPR measurement tools. On the basis of that review, we developed a 27-item questionnaire for CNPs to selfassess their operationalization of 9 CBPR principles. Our team comprised representatives of 9 of the National Cancer Institute's 25 CNPs. Results. Of the 25 CNPs, 22 (88%) completed the questionnaire. Most scored well on CBPR principles of recognizing community as a unit of identity, building on community strengths, facilitating colearning, embracing iterative processes in developing community capacity, and achieving a balance between data generation and intervention. CNPs varied in the extent to which they employed CBPR principles of addressing determinants of health, sharing power among partners, engaging the community in research dissemination, and striving for sustainability. Conclusions. Although the development of assessment tools in this field is in its infancy, our findings suggest that fidelity to CBPR processes can be assessed in a variety of settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1195-1203
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume102
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012

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Community Networks
Community-Based Participatory Research
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Health
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Operationalization of community-based participatory research principles : Assessment of the National Cancer Institute's Community Network Programs. / Braun, Kathryn L.; Nguyen, Tung T.; Tanjasiri, Sora Park; Campbell, Janis; Heiney, Sue P.; Brandt, Heather M.; Smith, Selina A.; Blumenthal, Daniel S.; Hargreaves, Margaret; Coe, Kathryn; Ma, Grace X.; Kenerson, Donna; Patel, Kushal; Tsark, Joann; Hébert, James R.

In: American journal of public health, Vol. 102, No. 6, 01.06.2012, p. 1195-1203.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Braun, KL, Nguyen, TT, Tanjasiri, SP, Campbell, J, Heiney, SP, Brandt, HM, Smith, SA, Blumenthal, DS, Hargreaves, M, Coe, K, Ma, GX, Kenerson, D, Patel, K, Tsark, J & Hébert, JR 2012, 'Operationalization of community-based participatory research principles: Assessment of the National Cancer Institute's Community Network Programs', American journal of public health, vol. 102, no. 6, pp. 1195-1203. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2011.300304
Braun, Kathryn L. ; Nguyen, Tung T. ; Tanjasiri, Sora Park ; Campbell, Janis ; Heiney, Sue P. ; Brandt, Heather M. ; Smith, Selina A. ; Blumenthal, Daniel S. ; Hargreaves, Margaret ; Coe, Kathryn ; Ma, Grace X. ; Kenerson, Donna ; Patel, Kushal ; Tsark, Joann ; Hébert, James R. / Operationalization of community-based participatory research principles : Assessment of the National Cancer Institute's Community Network Programs. In: American journal of public health. 2012 ; Vol. 102, No. 6. pp. 1195-1203.
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