Opinions about electronic cigarette use in smoke-free areas among U.S. adults, 2012

Ban Ahmed Majeed, Shanta R. Dube, Kymberle Sterling, Carrie Whitney, Michael P. Eriksen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: In the United States, electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are currently unregulated, extensively marketed, and experiencing a rapid increase in use. The purpose of this study was to examine the opinions of U.S. adults about e-cigarette use in smoke-free public areas. Methods: Data were obtained from the online HealthStyle survey administered to a probability sample of a nationally representative online panel. The study included 4,043 U.S. adults, aged 18 years or older who responded to this question, "Do you think e-cigarette should be allowed to be used in public areas where tobacco smoking is prohibited?" Multinomial logistic regression analyses were used to examine opinions on e-cigarette use in smoke-free areas by sex, age, race/ethnicity, household income, education, census region, and cigarette smoking status and e-cigarette awareness and ever use. Results: Overall, about 40% of adults were uncertain whether e-cigarettes should be allowed in smoke-free areas, 37% opposed, while 23% favored their use in smoke-free public places. Multinomial logistic regression analyses showed that adults who were aware, ever used e-cigarettes, and current cigarette smokers were more likely to express an "in favor" opinion than adults who expressed an uncertain opinion (don't know). Conclusion: Over 75% of U.S. adults reported uncertainty or disapproval of the use of e-cigarettes in smoke-free areas. Current cigarette smokers, adults aware or have ever used e-cigarettes were more supportive to exempting e-cigarettes from smoking restrictions. With impending regulation and the changing e-cigarette landscape, continued monitoring and research on public opinions about e-cigarette use in smoke-free places are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)675-681
Number of pages7
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Smoke
Smoking
Tobacco Products
Electronic Cigarettes
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Sampling Studies
Public Opinion
Censuses
Uncertainty
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Opinions about electronic cigarette use in smoke-free areas among U.S. adults, 2012. / Majeed, Ban Ahmed; Dube, Shanta R.; Sterling, Kymberle; Whitney, Carrie; Eriksen, Michael P.

In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Vol. 17, No. 6, 01.01.2015, p. 675-681.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Majeed, Ban Ahmed ; Dube, Shanta R. ; Sterling, Kymberle ; Whitney, Carrie ; Eriksen, Michael P. / Opinions about electronic cigarette use in smoke-free areas among U.S. adults, 2012. In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research. 2015 ; Vol. 17, No. 6. pp. 675-681.
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