Oral EBV and KSHV infection in HIV.

J. Webster-Cyriaque, K. Duus, C. Cooper, Michael B Duncan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The gamma herpesviruses, Kaposi's-sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), are tightly associated with the development of AIDS-associated oral disease and malignancy during immune suppression. The objective of this investigation was to characterize oral infection and pathogenesis in healthy and immune-suppressed individuals. To characterize oral EBV and KSHV infection, we examined throat washings and oral epithelial cells from HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals. Quantitative/real-time polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assays, transmission electronmicroscopy, immunostaining, and sequence analysis were used to identify viral infection. Virus was isolated from throat-wash samples and was used to infect epithelial and lymphoid cell lines. We detected EBV and KSHV in the oral cavity in healthy and immune-suppressed individuals. Viral strain analysis of KSHV K1 in multiple clones from the oral cavities of healthy persons and immunosuppressed patients detected several strains previously detected in KS lesions, with minor strain variation within individuals. Immunoelectron microscopy for multiple viral antigens detected consistent expression of viral proteins and oral epithelial specimens. In oral epithelial cells infected with wild-type KSHV in vitro, the K8.1 glycoprotein associated with lytic KSHV infection was detected in both primary and telomerase immortalized oral epithelial cultures by 24 hours post-infection. Virions were detected, subsequent to infection, by scanning electron microscopy. Oral epithelial cells were also infected in vitro with wild-type EBV originating from throat washes. Analysis of these data suggests that, like EBV, KSHV infection is present in the oropharynx of healthy individuals, is transmissible in vitro, and may be transmitted by saliva.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-95
Number of pages5
JournalAdvances in dental research
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006

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Herpesviridae Infections
Human Herpesvirus 8
Human Herpesvirus 4
HIV
Pharynx
Epithelial Cells
Mouth
Mouth Diseases
Infection
Oropharynx
Immunoelectron Microscopy
Viral Antigens
Herpesviridae
Telomerase
Viral Proteins
Virus Diseases
Saliva
Virion
Electron Scanning Microscopy
Sequence Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Webster-Cyriaque, J., Duus, K., Cooper, C., & Duncan, M. B. (2006). Oral EBV and KSHV infection in HIV. Advances in dental research, 19(1), 91-95. https://doi.org/10.1177/154407370601900118

Oral EBV and KSHV infection in HIV. / Webster-Cyriaque, J.; Duus, K.; Cooper, C.; Duncan, Michael B.

In: Advances in dental research, Vol. 19, No. 1, 01.01.2006, p. 91-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Webster-Cyriaque, J, Duus, K, Cooper, C & Duncan, MB 2006, 'Oral EBV and KSHV infection in HIV.', Advances in dental research, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 91-95. https://doi.org/10.1177/154407370601900118
Webster-Cyriaque J, Duus K, Cooper C, Duncan MB. Oral EBV and KSHV infection in HIV. Advances in dental research. 2006 Jan 1;19(1):91-95. https://doi.org/10.1177/154407370601900118
Webster-Cyriaque, J. ; Duus, K. ; Cooper, C. ; Duncan, Michael B. / Oral EBV and KSHV infection in HIV. In: Advances in dental research. 2006 ; Vol. 19, No. 1. pp. 91-95.
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