Osmotic blistering in enamel bonded with one-step self-etch adhesives

Franklin Chi Meng Tay, C. N.S. Lai, S. Chersoni, David Henry Pashley, Y. F. Mak, P. Suppa, C. Prati, N. M. King

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One-step self-etch adhesives behave as permeable membranes after polymerization, permitting water to move through the cured adhesives. We hypothesize that osmotic blistering occurs in bonded enamel when these adhesives are used without composite coupling. Tooth surfaces from extracted human premolars were bonded with 5 one-step self-etch adhesives. They were immersed in distilled water or 4.8 M CaCl2, and examined by stereomicroscopy, field-emission/environmental SEM, and TEM. Water blisters were observed in bonded enamel but not in bonded dentin when specimens were immersed in water. They collapsed when water was subsequently replaced with CaCl2. Blisters were absent from enamel in specimens that were immersed in CaCl 2 only. Water trees were identified from adhesive-enamel interfaces. Osmotic blistering in enamel is probably caused by the low water permeability of enamel. This creates an osmotic gradient between the bonded enamel and the external environment, causing water sorption into the interface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)290-295
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Dental Research
Volume83
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Fingerprint

Dental Enamel
Adhesives
Water
Blister
Bicuspid
Dentin
Polymerization
Permeability
Tooth
Membranes

Keywords

  • Enamel
  • Osmosis
  • Self-etch
  • Water blisters
  • Water trees

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Tay, F. C. M., Lai, C. N. S., Chersoni, S., Pashley, D. H., Mak, Y. F., Suppa, P., ... King, N. M. (2004). Osmotic blistering in enamel bonded with one-step self-etch adhesives. Journal of Dental Research, 83(4), 290-295. https://doi.org/10.1177/154405910408300404

Osmotic blistering in enamel bonded with one-step self-etch adhesives. / Tay, Franklin Chi Meng; Lai, C. N.S.; Chersoni, S.; Pashley, David Henry; Mak, Y. F.; Suppa, P.; Prati, C.; King, N. M.

In: Journal of Dental Research, Vol. 83, No. 4, 01.01.2004, p. 290-295.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tay, FCM, Lai, CNS, Chersoni, S, Pashley, DH, Mak, YF, Suppa, P, Prati, C & King, NM 2004, 'Osmotic blistering in enamel bonded with one-step self-etch adhesives', Journal of Dental Research, vol. 83, no. 4, pp. 290-295. https://doi.org/10.1177/154405910408300404
Tay, Franklin Chi Meng ; Lai, C. N.S. ; Chersoni, S. ; Pashley, David Henry ; Mak, Y. F. ; Suppa, P. ; Prati, C. ; King, N. M. / Osmotic blistering in enamel bonded with one-step self-etch adhesives. In: Journal of Dental Research. 2004 ; Vol. 83, No. 4. pp. 290-295.
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