Outcome of therapy-related acute promyelocytic leukemia with or without arsenic trioxide as a component of frontline therapy

Farshid Dayyani, Hagop Kantarjian, Susan O'Brien, Sherry Pierce, Dan Jones, Stefan Faderl, Guillermo Garcia-Manero, Jorge Cortes, Farhad Ravandi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Patients with therapy-related acute promyelocytic leukemia (t-APL) have been commonly exposed to topoisomerase inhibitors and may potentially benefit from induction regimens omitting anthracyclines. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of the outcomes of 29 patients with t-APL who were either treated with arsenic trioxide (ATO) and all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) or with standard ATRA plus anthracycline-based chemotherapy was performed. RESULTS: Prior therapy included chemotherapy alone, radiation alone, or a combination of the 2 in 19%, 33%, and 47% of patients, respectively. The combination of ATO and ATRA (n = 19) for induction resulted in a similar remission rate compared with ATRA plus chemotherapy (n = 10) (89% vs 70%; P =.35). The median overall survival for the patients treated with ATRA plus ATO was not reached compared with that for patients treated with ATRA plus chemotherapy (161 weeks; P =.79). CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of t-APL patients, outcomes with ATO and ATRA appeared to be comparable to anthracycline-containing induction regimens. This combination may be preferable in t-APL patients to avoid any risk of anthracycline-induced toxicities. Cancer 2011.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)110-115
Number of pages6
JournalCancer
Volume117
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

Keywords

  • all-trans-retinoic acid
  • arsenic trioxide
  • outcome
  • therapy-related acute promyelocytic leukemia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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