Overuse of acid suppression therapy in hospitalized patients

Ruchi Gupta, Praveen Garg, Ravi Kottoor, Juan Carlos Munoz, M. Mazen Jamal, Louis R. Lambiase, Kenneth J Vega

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Acid suppression therapy (AST) is one of the most commonly prescribed classes of medications in hospitalized patients. Multiple studies have shown that AST is overused during inpatient admissions. However, minimal data is available regarding the frequency and patient characteristics of those discharged on unnecessary AST. The aims of the study were to examine administration of AST on admission, to characterize the patient population discharged on unnecessary AST and to determine predictive factors for inappropriate administration of AST in hospitalized patients. Methods: A retrospective chart review of randomly selected patients admitted to the general medicine service at University of Florida Health Science Center/Jacksonville from August to October 2006 for appropriateness of AST was done. The admitting diagnosis, indications for starting AST, type of AST used, and discharge on these medications was recorded on a case by case basis. Results: Seventy percent of patients were started on AST on admission. Of these, 73% were unnecessary. Stress ulcers prophylaxis in low risk patients or the concomitant use of ulcerogenic drugs motivated initiation of therapy most frequently. Sixty nine percent of patients started on inappropriate AST were discharged on the same regimen. Admitting diagnosis, age of patient, length of stay, or concomitant use of ulcerogenic drugs did not predict continuation of unnecessary AST at discharge. Conclusion: AST is overused in hospitalized patients. This primarily occurred in low risk patients and was compounded by continuation at discharge. This significantly increases cost to the health care system and the risk of drug interactions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-211
Number of pages5
JournalSouthern medical journal
Volume103
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

Fingerprint

Acids
Therapeutics
Drug Interactions
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Ulcer
Inpatients
Length of Stay
Medicine
Delivery of Health Care
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health
Population

Keywords

  • Acid suppression therapy
  • Hospitalized
  • Overuse
  • Proton pump inhibitors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Gupta, R., Garg, P., Kottoor, R., Munoz, J. C., Jamal, M. M., Lambiase, L. R., & Vega, K. J. (2010). Overuse of acid suppression therapy in hospitalized patients. Southern medical journal, 103(3), 207-211. https://doi.org/10.1097/SMJ.0b013e3181ce0e7a

Overuse of acid suppression therapy in hospitalized patients. / Gupta, Ruchi; Garg, Praveen; Kottoor, Ravi; Munoz, Juan Carlos; Jamal, M. Mazen; Lambiase, Louis R.; Vega, Kenneth J.

In: Southern medical journal, Vol. 103, No. 3, 01.03.2010, p. 207-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gupta, R, Garg, P, Kottoor, R, Munoz, JC, Jamal, MM, Lambiase, LR & Vega, KJ 2010, 'Overuse of acid suppression therapy in hospitalized patients', Southern medical journal, vol. 103, no. 3, pp. 207-211. https://doi.org/10.1097/SMJ.0b013e3181ce0e7a
Gupta R, Garg P, Kottoor R, Munoz JC, Jamal MM, Lambiase LR et al. Overuse of acid suppression therapy in hospitalized patients. Southern medical journal. 2010 Mar 1;103(3):207-211. https://doi.org/10.1097/SMJ.0b013e3181ce0e7a
Gupta, Ruchi ; Garg, Praveen ; Kottoor, Ravi ; Munoz, Juan Carlos ; Jamal, M. Mazen ; Lambiase, Louis R. ; Vega, Kenneth J. / Overuse of acid suppression therapy in hospitalized patients. In: Southern medical journal. 2010 ; Vol. 103, No. 3. pp. 207-211.
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