Oxidative stress and cardiovascular risk in overweight children in an exercise intervention program

B. Adam Dennis, Adviye Ergul, Barbara A. Gower, Jerry David Allison, Catherine Lucy Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to determine whether oxidative stress was related to cardiovascular risk indices in children, and whether an exercise intervention would reduce oxidative stress. Methods: A randomized trial of two different doses of exercise and a no-exercise control group included 112 overweight and obese children, 7-11 years old. Plasma isoprostane levels were obtained at baseline and after the intervention. Cross-sectional analysis of oxidative stress and metabolic markers at baseline was performed. The effect of the exercise training on oxidative stress was tested. Results: Lower isoprostane levels were observed in blacks. At baseline, isoprostane was positively related to measures of fatness (BMI, waist circumference, percent body fat), insulin resistance and β-cell function (fasting insulin, insulin area under the curve, Matsuda index, disposition index, oral disposition index), and several lipid markers (low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, total cholesterol), and inversely with fitness [peak oxygen consumption (VO2)], independent of race, sex, and cohort. No relation was found with visceral fat, blood pressure, or glycemia. Independent of percent body fat, isoprostane predicted triglycerides, β=0.23, total cholesterol-to-high-density lipoprotein (TC/HDL) ratio, β=0.23, and insulin resistance (insulin area under the curve, β=0.24, Matsuda index, β=-0.21, oral disposition index, β=0.33). Exercise did not reduce oxidative stress levels, despite reduced fatness and improved fitness in these children. Conclusions: Isoprostane levels were related to several markers of cardiovascular risk at baseline; however, despite reduced fatness and improved fitness, no effect of exercise was observed on isoprostane levels. To our knowledge, this is the first report in children to demonstrate a correlation of oxidative stress with disposition index, fitness, and TC/HDL ratio, the first to test the effect on oxidative stress of an exercise intervention that reduced body fat, and the first such exercise intervention study to include a substantial proportion of black children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-21
Number of pages7
JournalChildhood Obesity
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2013

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Isoprostanes
Oxidative Stress
Exercise
Adipose Tissue
Insulin
HDL Cholesterol
Area Under Curve
Insulin Resistance
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Waist Circumference
Oxygen Consumption
Fasting
Triglycerides
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cholesterol
Blood Pressure
Lipids
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Oxidative stress and cardiovascular risk in overweight children in an exercise intervention program. / Dennis, B. Adam; Ergul, Adviye; Gower, Barbara A.; Allison, Jerry David; Davis, Catherine Lucy.

In: Childhood Obesity, Vol. 9, No. 1, 01.02.2013, p. 15-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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