Pain Management in the Last Six Months of Life Among Women Who Died of Ovarian Cancer

Sharon J. Rolnick, Jody Jackson, Winnie W. Nelson, Amy Butani, Lisa J. Herrinton, Mark Hornbrook, Christine Neslund-Dudas, Don J. Bachman, Steven Scott Coughlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous studies indicate that the symptoms of many dying cancer patients are undertreated and many suffer unnecessary pain. We obtained data retrospectively from three large health maintenance organizations, and examined the analgesic drug therapies received in the last six months of life by women who died of ovarian cancer between 1995 and 2000. Subjects were identified through cancer registries and administrative data. Outpatient medications used during the final six months of life were obtained from pharmacy databases. Pain information was obtained from medical charts. We categorized each medication based on the World Health Organization classification for pain management (mild, moderate, or intense). Of the 421 women, only 64 (15%) had no mention of pain in their charts. The use of medications typically prescribed for moderate to severe pain ("high intensity" drugs) increased as women approached death. At 5-6 months before death, 55% of women were either on no pain medication or medication generally used for mild pain; only 9% were using the highest intensity regimen. The percentage on the highest intensity regimen (drugs generally used for severe pain) increased to 22% at 3-4 months before death and 54% at 1-2 months. Older women (70 or older) were less likely to be prescribed the highest intensity medication than those under age 70 (44% vs. 70%, P < 0.001). No differences were found in the use of the high intensity drugs by race, marital status, year of diagnosis, stage of disease, or comorbidity. Our finding that only 54% of women with pain were given high intensity medication near death indicates room for improvement in the care of ovarian cancer patients at the end of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-31
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Pain and Symptom Management
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pain Management
Ovarian Neoplasms
Pain
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Health Maintenance Organizations
Marital Status
Analgesics
Registries
Comorbidity
Neoplasms
Outpatients
Databases
Drug Therapy

Keywords

  • Analgesics
  • ovarian neoplasms
  • pain
  • palliative care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Pain Management in the Last Six Months of Life Among Women Who Died of Ovarian Cancer. / Rolnick, Sharon J.; Jackson, Jody; Nelson, Winnie W.; Butani, Amy; Herrinton, Lisa J.; Hornbrook, Mark; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Bachman, Don J.; Coughlin, Steven Scott.

In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, Vol. 33, No. 1, 01.01.2007, p. 24-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rolnick, SJ, Jackson, J, Nelson, WW, Butani, A, Herrinton, LJ, Hornbrook, M, Neslund-Dudas, C, Bachman, DJ & Coughlin, SS 2007, 'Pain Management in the Last Six Months of Life Among Women Who Died of Ovarian Cancer', Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 24-31. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2006.06.010
Rolnick, Sharon J. ; Jackson, Jody ; Nelson, Winnie W. ; Butani, Amy ; Herrinton, Lisa J. ; Hornbrook, Mark ; Neslund-Dudas, Christine ; Bachman, Don J. ; Coughlin, Steven Scott. / Pain Management in the Last Six Months of Life Among Women Who Died of Ovarian Cancer. In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. 2007 ; Vol. 33, No. 1. pp. 24-31.
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