Parental history of atopic disease and concentration of cord blood IgE

C. C. Johnson, Dennis Randall Ownby, E. L. Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background - A family history of atopy, and cord blood immunoglobulin E concentration, have been shown to be predictors of atopic disease in children. Several studies have suggested that parental atopy may be related to newborn immunoglobulin E. Objective - The purpose of our analysis was to evaluate whether parental history of allergic disease was associated with cord blood immunoglobulin E concentration. Methods - The study subjects were from a defined population of 777 newborns delivered between 1987 and 1989. The mothers of these children completed a questionnaire during pregnancy concerning themselves and the child's father, including parental history of physician diagnosis of allergic diseases (allergies, hay fever and asthma). Total immunoglobulin E levels were quantitated in cord blood samples with an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Results - Median cord blood immunoglobulin E concentration was higher among infants whose mothers had a history of atopic disease, particularly for those with a history of asthma (P < 0.022) and allergen immunotherapy (P < 0.016) vs infants whose mothers had no history of any atopic disease. Comparing all babies with a maternal history of asthma, to babies where neither parent had a history of any atopic disease, the median cord blood immunoglobulin E was significantly higher (0.36 IU/mL vs 0.21 IU/mL; P < 0.009). This association was found only among female infants (0.49 IU/mL vs 0.20 IU/mL; P < 0.001). Conclusion - Maternal, but not paternal, history of atopic disease was associated with an elevated immunoglobulin E among newborns. For maternal asthma, this association was only evident in infant girls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)624-629
Number of pages6
JournalClinical and Experimental Allergy
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 19 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fetal Blood
Immunoglobulin E
Mothers
Asthma
Newborn Infant
Immunologic Desensitization
Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Fathers
Hypersensitivity
Physicians
Pregnancy
Population

Keywords

  • Carter effect
  • Cord blood IgE
  • Epidemiology
  • Family history

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Parental history of atopic disease and concentration of cord blood IgE. / Johnson, C. C.; Ownby, Dennis Randall; Peterson, E. L.

In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, Vol. 26, No. 6, 19.07.1996, p. 624-629.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e3e9109b00744a47a15f07971d524e9a,
title = "Parental history of atopic disease and concentration of cord blood IgE",
abstract = "Background - A family history of atopy, and cord blood immunoglobulin E concentration, have been shown to be predictors of atopic disease in children. Several studies have suggested that parental atopy may be related to newborn immunoglobulin E. Objective - The purpose of our analysis was to evaluate whether parental history of allergic disease was associated with cord blood immunoglobulin E concentration. Methods - The study subjects were from a defined population of 777 newborns delivered between 1987 and 1989. The mothers of these children completed a questionnaire during pregnancy concerning themselves and the child's father, including parental history of physician diagnosis of allergic diseases (allergies, hay fever and asthma). Total immunoglobulin E levels were quantitated in cord blood samples with an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Results - Median cord blood immunoglobulin E concentration was higher among infants whose mothers had a history of atopic disease, particularly for those with a history of asthma (P < 0.022) and allergen immunotherapy (P < 0.016) vs infants whose mothers had no history of any atopic disease. Comparing all babies with a maternal history of asthma, to babies where neither parent had a history of any atopic disease, the median cord blood immunoglobulin E was significantly higher (0.36 IU/mL vs 0.21 IU/mL; P < 0.009). This association was found only among female infants (0.49 IU/mL vs 0.20 IU/mL; P < 0.001). Conclusion - Maternal, but not paternal, history of atopic disease was associated with an elevated immunoglobulin E among newborns. For maternal asthma, this association was only evident in infant girls.",
keywords = "Carter effect, Cord blood IgE, Epidemiology, Family history",
author = "Johnson, {C. C.} and Ownby, {Dennis Randall} and Peterson, {E. L.}",
year = "1996",
month = "7",
day = "19",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2222.1996.tb00588.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "624--629",
journal = "Clinical and Experimental Allergy",
issn = "0954-7894",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Parental history of atopic disease and concentration of cord blood IgE

AU - Johnson, C. C.

AU - Ownby, Dennis Randall

AU - Peterson, E. L.

PY - 1996/7/19

Y1 - 1996/7/19

N2 - Background - A family history of atopy, and cord blood immunoglobulin E concentration, have been shown to be predictors of atopic disease in children. Several studies have suggested that parental atopy may be related to newborn immunoglobulin E. Objective - The purpose of our analysis was to evaluate whether parental history of allergic disease was associated with cord blood immunoglobulin E concentration. Methods - The study subjects were from a defined population of 777 newborns delivered between 1987 and 1989. The mothers of these children completed a questionnaire during pregnancy concerning themselves and the child's father, including parental history of physician diagnosis of allergic diseases (allergies, hay fever and asthma). Total immunoglobulin E levels were quantitated in cord blood samples with an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Results - Median cord blood immunoglobulin E concentration was higher among infants whose mothers had a history of atopic disease, particularly for those with a history of asthma (P < 0.022) and allergen immunotherapy (P < 0.016) vs infants whose mothers had no history of any atopic disease. Comparing all babies with a maternal history of asthma, to babies where neither parent had a history of any atopic disease, the median cord blood immunoglobulin E was significantly higher (0.36 IU/mL vs 0.21 IU/mL; P < 0.009). This association was found only among female infants (0.49 IU/mL vs 0.20 IU/mL; P < 0.001). Conclusion - Maternal, but not paternal, history of atopic disease was associated with an elevated immunoglobulin E among newborns. For maternal asthma, this association was only evident in infant girls.

AB - Background - A family history of atopy, and cord blood immunoglobulin E concentration, have been shown to be predictors of atopic disease in children. Several studies have suggested that parental atopy may be related to newborn immunoglobulin E. Objective - The purpose of our analysis was to evaluate whether parental history of allergic disease was associated with cord blood immunoglobulin E concentration. Methods - The study subjects were from a defined population of 777 newborns delivered between 1987 and 1989. The mothers of these children completed a questionnaire during pregnancy concerning themselves and the child's father, including parental history of physician diagnosis of allergic diseases (allergies, hay fever and asthma). Total immunoglobulin E levels were quantitated in cord blood samples with an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Results - Median cord blood immunoglobulin E concentration was higher among infants whose mothers had a history of atopic disease, particularly for those with a history of asthma (P < 0.022) and allergen immunotherapy (P < 0.016) vs infants whose mothers had no history of any atopic disease. Comparing all babies with a maternal history of asthma, to babies where neither parent had a history of any atopic disease, the median cord blood immunoglobulin E was significantly higher (0.36 IU/mL vs 0.21 IU/mL; P < 0.009). This association was found only among female infants (0.49 IU/mL vs 0.20 IU/mL; P < 0.001). Conclusion - Maternal, but not paternal, history of atopic disease was associated with an elevated immunoglobulin E among newborns. For maternal asthma, this association was only evident in infant girls.

KW - Carter effect

KW - Cord blood IgE

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Family history

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029989029&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029989029&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-2222.1996.tb00588.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-2222.1996.tb00588.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 8809419

AN - SCOPUS:0029989029

VL - 26

SP - 624

EP - 629

JO - Clinical and Experimental Allergy

JF - Clinical and Experimental Allergy

SN - 0954-7894

IS - 6

ER -