Pathway to Weight Maintenance: A-Qualitative Study with Church Health Advisors to Assess Weight Loss Maintenance Program Needs Among African-Americans

Lovoria B. Williams, Merry Ann Stewart, Amber McCall, Thomas Vayalinkara Joshua, Robert Sarfo, Barbara Jane Threatt Garvin, Lucy Nelle Marion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Nearly 50% of African-American adults are obese. Obesity is a known contributor to chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM). Short-term Diabetes Prevention Programs (DPPs) achieve short-term weight loss success, but weight regain is common. African-Americans, compared to Whites, are particularly challenged by weight maintenance. In collaboration with community health workers, translation scientists have delivered successful short-term DPPs in community settings, such as African-American churches. Evidence of the salient components of effective weight maintenance intervention is minimal, especially among African-Americans in churches, and there is no known research that specifically explores the insights of community health workers. We report findings from a qualitative study to identify the necessary components of a sustainable church-based weight maintenance program from the perspective of community health workers. Two main themes emerged: overemphasis of short-term goals and consistent support. These findings have relevancy for developing faith-based weight maintenance programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-45
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of National Black Nurses' Association : JNBNA
Volume27
Issue number2
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

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Weight Reduction Programs
African Americans
Maintenance
Weights and Measures
Health
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Weight Loss
Chronic Disease
Obesity
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Pathway to Weight Maintenance: A-Qualitative Study with Church Health Advisors to Assess Weight Loss Maintenance Program Needs Among African-Americans",
abstract = "Nearly 50{\%} of African-American adults are obese. Obesity is a known contributor to chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM). Short-term Diabetes Prevention Programs (DPPs) achieve short-term weight loss success, but weight regain is common. African-Americans, compared to Whites, are particularly challenged by weight maintenance. In collaboration with community health workers, translation scientists have delivered successful short-term DPPs in community settings, such as African-American churches. Evidence of the salient components of effective weight maintenance intervention is minimal, especially among African-Americans in churches, and there is no known research that specifically explores the insights of community health workers. We report findings from a qualitative study to identify the necessary components of a sustainable church-based weight maintenance program from the perspective of community health workers. Two main themes emerged: overemphasis of short-term goals and consistent support. These findings have relevancy for developing faith-based weight maintenance programs.",
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