Patient Knowledge Regarding Colorectal Cancer Risk, Opinion of Screening, and Preferences for a Screening Test

Courtney C. Moreno, Thomas Jarrett, Brianna L. Vey, Pardeep K. Mittal, Elizabeth A. Krupinski, David L. Roberts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: To assess patient knowledge about colorectal cancer incidence and prognosis as well as willingness to undergo screening with various tests (eg, optical colonoscopy, stool-based tests, computed tomographic colonography (CTC)). Materials and Methods: A survey was administered to consecutive patients of a general academic-based internal medicine clinic. Results: Survey response rate was 86.3%. A majority of respondents (55%) reported being aware of general information about colorectal cancer, and 99% indicated a belief that colorectal cancer screening was a good idea. A majority of respondents (73%) were willing to undergo optical colonoscopy, and some were willing to undergo stool-based tests (48%), or CT colonography CTC (40%). A majority reported being more willing to undergo a colorectal cancer screening test if the test did not involve radiation (86%), did not involve insertion of a tube or device into the rectum (78%), did not involve a pre‐proceduralpreprocedural bowel cleansing regimen (73%), or did not involve sedation (60%). Conclusion: Improved patient education about the negligible radiation risk associated with CTC or development of a non‐invasive imaging test that did not involve a preprocedural bowel cleansing regimen may increase rates of colorectal cancer screening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)50-52
Number of pages3
JournalCurrent Problems in Diagnostic Radiology
Volume48
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2019

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Computed Tomographic Colonography
Colorectal Neoplasms
Early Detection of Cancer
Colonoscopy
Radiation
Patient Education
Internal Medicine
Rectum
Equipment and Supplies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Patient Knowledge Regarding Colorectal Cancer Risk, Opinion of Screening, and Preferences for a Screening Test. / Moreno, Courtney C.; Jarrett, Thomas; Vey, Brianna L.; Mittal, Pardeep K.; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Roberts, David L.

In: Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology, Vol. 48, No. 1, 01.2019, p. 50-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moreno, Courtney C. ; Jarrett, Thomas ; Vey, Brianna L. ; Mittal, Pardeep K. ; Krupinski, Elizabeth A. ; Roberts, David L. / Patient Knowledge Regarding Colorectal Cancer Risk, Opinion of Screening, and Preferences for a Screening Test. In: Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology. 2019 ; Vol. 48, No. 1. pp. 50-52.
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