Peak Systolic Blood Pressure on a Graded Maximal Exercise Test and the Blood Pressure Response to an Acute Bout of Submaximal Exercise

Amy N. Syme, Bruce E. Blanchard, Margaux A. Guidry, Amy W. Taylor, Jaci L. VanHeest, Scott Hasson, Paul D. Thompson, Linda S. Pescatello

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Blood pressure (BP) is immediately reduced after aerobic exercise (postexercise hypotension [PEH]). Whether peak systolic BP on a maximal graded exercise stress test (GEST) relates to PEH is not known. This study examined associations between peak systolic BP on a GEST and PEH. Subjects were 50 men (mean ± SEM age 43.8 ± 1.3 years) with elevated BP (145.3 ± 1.5/85.9 ±1.1 mm Hg). Men completed a GEST and 3 experiments: nonexercise control and 2 cycle bouts at 40% (LIGHT) and 60% (MODERATE) of maximal oxygen consumption. After the experiments, subjects left the laboratory wearing ambulatory BP monitors. Peak systolic BP on a GEST was categorized into tertiles: low (n = 17, 197.4 ± 2.0 mm Hg), medium (n = 16, 218.4 ± 1.4 mm Hg), and high (n = 17, 248.9 ± 2.8 mm Hg). Repeated-measures analysis of variance tested if BP differed over time and among experimental conditions and peak systolic BP groups. In men with high peak systolic BP, systolic BP was reduced by 7.3 ± 2.6 mm Hg after LIGHT and by 5.0 ± 2.2 mm Hg after MODERATE compared with nonexercise control over 10 hours, with the more apparent effects seen after LIGHT (p <0.05). In men with low peak systolic BP, systolic BP was reduced by 6.3 ± 2.3 mm Hg after MODERATE compared with nonexercise control over 10 hours (p <0.05). In men with medium peak systolic BP, systolic BP was not different after exercise compared with nonexercise control over 10 hours (p ≥0.05). Men with high peak systolic BP had decreased systolic BP to the greatest extent after LIGHT, whereas men with low peak systolic BP reduced systolic BP after MODERATE. In conclusion, the findings of this study suggest that peak systolic BP on a GEST may be used to characterize which men with hypertension will have decreased systolic BP after acute submaximal aerobic exercise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)938-943
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume98
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2006

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Exercise Test
Exercise
Blood Pressure
Post-Exercise Hypotension
Light

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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Syme, A. N., Blanchard, B. E., Guidry, M. A., Taylor, A. W., VanHeest, J. L., Hasson, S., ... Pescatello, L. S. (2006). Peak Systolic Blood Pressure on a Graded Maximal Exercise Test and the Blood Pressure Response to an Acute Bout of Submaximal Exercise. American Journal of Cardiology, 98(7), 938-943. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2006.05.012

Peak Systolic Blood Pressure on a Graded Maximal Exercise Test and the Blood Pressure Response to an Acute Bout of Submaximal Exercise. / Syme, Amy N.; Blanchard, Bruce E.; Guidry, Margaux A.; Taylor, Amy W.; VanHeest, Jaci L.; Hasson, Scott; Thompson, Paul D.; Pescatello, Linda S.

In: American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 98, No. 7, 01.10.2006, p. 938-943.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Syme, AN, Blanchard, BE, Guidry, MA, Taylor, AW, VanHeest, JL, Hasson, S, Thompson, PD & Pescatello, LS 2006, 'Peak Systolic Blood Pressure on a Graded Maximal Exercise Test and the Blood Pressure Response to an Acute Bout of Submaximal Exercise', American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 98, no. 7, pp. 938-943. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2006.05.012
Syme, Amy N. ; Blanchard, Bruce E. ; Guidry, Margaux A. ; Taylor, Amy W. ; VanHeest, Jaci L. ; Hasson, Scott ; Thompson, Paul D. ; Pescatello, Linda S. / Peak Systolic Blood Pressure on a Graded Maximal Exercise Test and the Blood Pressure Response to an Acute Bout of Submaximal Exercise. In: American Journal of Cardiology. 2006 ; Vol. 98, No. 7. pp. 938-943.
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