Pectoralis major tendon repairs in the active-duty population.

Ivan J. Antosh, Jason A. Grassbaugh, Stephen Arthur Parada, Edward D. Arrington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rupture of the pectoralis major tendon is an uncommon injury that typically occurs in young, active people. Of this injury population, active-duty military personnel represent a unique, athletic subset that is commonly treated with operative repair. For the retrospective case series reported here, we hypothesized that active-duty soldiers with acute and chronic pectoralis major tendon ruptures treated with operative repair would have high levels of patient satisfaction, quick return to work and sports, and few long-term complications. We retrospectively reviewed all pectoralis major tendon rupture repairs performed at our institution between 2000 and 2007. Charts were thoroughly reviewed, and patients were asked to complete DASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand) and supplemental questionnaires. Paired Student's t test was performed, and Ps were calculated to analyze statistical differences between immediate- and delayed-treatment groups. Fourteen patients were identified. The most common mechanism of injury was bench-pressing weights. Overall DASH, Work Module, and Sports Module scores were good to excellent. There was a statistically significant difference between outcomes for the immediate- and delayed- treatment groups, with the immediate-treatment group having better overall DASH and Work Module scores. Patients had a 30% to 40% objective loss of strength after surgery. Active-duty soldiers reported acceptable overall outcomes after both immediate and delayed treatment for pectoralis major tendon ruptures, but a statistically significant difference was found in overall DASH and Work Module scores between the treatment groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26-30
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.)
Volume38
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Tendons
Rupture
Military Personnel
Arm
Hand
Population
Sports
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics
Return to Work
Patient Satisfaction
Students
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Pectoralis major tendon repairs in the active-duty population. / Antosh, Ivan J.; Grassbaugh, Jason A.; Parada, Stephen Arthur; Arrington, Edward D.

In: American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.), Vol. 38, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 26-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Antosh, Ivan J. ; Grassbaugh, Jason A. ; Parada, Stephen Arthur ; Arrington, Edward D. / Pectoralis major tendon repairs in the active-duty population. In: American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.). 2009 ; Vol. 38, No. 1. pp. 26-30.
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