Pediatric emergency physicians and communicable diseases

Can we be trusted to take care of ourselves?

Natalie E Lane, Ronald I. Paul, Denise F. Bratcher, Beth H. Stover

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine if pediatric emergency physicians (PEP) are following Centers for Disease Control find Prevention (CDC) recommendations that all health care workers receive routine vaccines and annual tuberculosis screens. Design: A two-page mail survey with one follow-up mailing. Participants: All active members of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), Section on Emergency Medicine. Additional inclusion criteria were completion of training and employment in an emergency setting. Results: Of 407 surveys, 286 (60%) were returned; 209 met inclusion criteria. Proof of immunization was not required of 43 % of PEP; 42% were not required to have an annual tuberculosis (TB) screen. PEP reported immunity to the following: polio (95%), measles (94%), hepatitis B (91%), rubella (90%), mumps (90%), varicella (90%), and diphtheria-tetanus (86%). However, only 72% received a TB screen, and 60% received an influenza vaccine within the post year. Proof of vaccination for employment was required by 57/85 hospitals, 47/79 universities, and 6/32 self-employed/group practices (χ2, p < 0.001). Proof of an annual TB screen was required by 64/87 hospitals, 44/82 universities, and 8/32 self-employed/group practices (χ2, P < 0.001). PEP were more likely to have had a recent annual TB screen if required by their employer (104/117) than if left to their own initiative (42/87) (χ2, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Although PEP are well protected against most vaccine-preventable diseases, many are not receiving annual TB screens nor influenza vaccines. The CDC guidelines are not being routinely followed by PEP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)308-311
Number of pages4
JournalPediatric Emergency Care
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1997

Fingerprint

Communicable Diseases
Emergencies
Pediatrics
Physicians
Tuberculosis
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Group Practice
Influenza Vaccines
Tuberculosis Vaccines
Mumps
Diphtheria
Chickenpox
Rubella
Emergency Medicine
Tetanus
Measles
Postal Service
Poliomyelitis
Hepatitis B
Immunity

Keywords

  • Immunity
  • Pediatric emergency physicians
  • Tuberculosis
  • Vaccines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Pediatric emergency physicians and communicable diseases : Can we be trusted to take care of ourselves? / Lane, Natalie E; Paul, Ronald I.; Bratcher, Denise F.; Stover, Beth H.

In: Pediatric Emergency Care, Vol. 13, No. 5, 01.10.1997, p. 308-311.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lane, Natalie E ; Paul, Ronald I. ; Bratcher, Denise F. ; Stover, Beth H. / Pediatric emergency physicians and communicable diseases : Can we be trusted to take care of ourselves?. In: Pediatric Emergency Care. 1997 ; Vol. 13, No. 5. pp. 308-311.
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