Pediatric trans-oral submandibular gland excision: A safe and effective technique

Charles Anthony Hughes, J. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction In the pediatric population the submandibular gland requires removal in a number of conditions including, refractory recurrent sialoadenitis, sialolithiasis, salivary gland neoplasms and debilitating sialorrhea. In comparison to the traditional trans-cervical approach, the trans-oral route avoids a cervical scar, potential keloid formation and decreased risk of injury to the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve. This approach also eliminates the potentiality of remnant duct disease since the entire duct and papillae are removed. The article demonstrates the appropriateness of this method in the pediatric population and discusses the anatomy and technique. Methods Retrospective review of ten pediatric patients who underwent trans-oral submandibular gland excision, the series was analyzed for age, gender, indication for procedure, complications, length of hospitalization, and postoperative pathology. Patients were followed for a minimum of 12 months. Results 7 females and 3 males aged 9 to 17 underwent the procedure. Recurrent sialoadenitis, and sialolithiasis, accounted for 6 cases while salivary neoplasms (pleomorphic adenoma) accounted for 4 cases. No patient suffered vessel or nerve injury and no patient showed recurrent disease at 12 months follow-up. All glands were completely removed and no patient required conversion to the trans-cervical approach. Conclusions Trans-oral submandibular gland excision is safe and effective in the pediatric population. This method avoids a cervical scar, avoids injury to the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve, and completely removes the duct, eliminating the potentiality of remnant duct disease. The authors have performed ten trans-oral submandibular gland excisions in pediatric patients without complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-16
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Volume93
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Fingerprint

Submandibular Gland
Pediatrics
Salivary Gland Calculi
Sialadenitis
Facial Nerve
Cicatrix
Wounds and Injuries
Salivary Gland Neoplasms
Sialorrhea
Population
Keloid
Pleomorphic Adenoma
Anatomy
Hospitalization
Pathology
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Pediatric
  • Salivary gland tumors
  • Sialoandenitis
  • Submandibular gland
  • Trans-oral excision

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Pediatric trans-oral submandibular gland excision : A safe and effective technique. / Hughes, Charles Anthony; Brown, J.

In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, Vol. 93, 01.02.2017, p. 13-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{037f28a6d1e74df2aecddac2d3aabc66,
title = "Pediatric trans-oral submandibular gland excision: A safe and effective technique",
abstract = "Introduction In the pediatric population the submandibular gland requires removal in a number of conditions including, refractory recurrent sialoadenitis, sialolithiasis, salivary gland neoplasms and debilitating sialorrhea. In comparison to the traditional trans-cervical approach, the trans-oral route avoids a cervical scar, potential keloid formation and decreased risk of injury to the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve. This approach also eliminates the potentiality of remnant duct disease since the entire duct and papillae are removed. The article demonstrates the appropriateness of this method in the pediatric population and discusses the anatomy and technique. Methods Retrospective review of ten pediatric patients who underwent trans-oral submandibular gland excision, the series was analyzed for age, gender, indication for procedure, complications, length of hospitalization, and postoperative pathology. Patients were followed for a minimum of 12 months. Results 7 females and 3 males aged 9 to 17 underwent the procedure. Recurrent sialoadenitis, and sialolithiasis, accounted for 6 cases while salivary neoplasms (pleomorphic adenoma) accounted for 4 cases. No patient suffered vessel or nerve injury and no patient showed recurrent disease at 12 months follow-up. All glands were completely removed and no patient required conversion to the trans-cervical approach. Conclusions Trans-oral submandibular gland excision is safe and effective in the pediatric population. This method avoids a cervical scar, avoids injury to the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve, and completely removes the duct, eliminating the potentiality of remnant duct disease. The authors have performed ten trans-oral submandibular gland excisions in pediatric patients without complications.",
keywords = "Pediatric, Salivary gland tumors, Sialoandenitis, Submandibular gland, Trans-oral excision",
author = "Hughes, {Charles Anthony} and J. Brown",
year = "2017",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijporl.2016.11.026",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "93",
pages = "13--16",
journal = "International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology",
issn = "0165-5876",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pediatric trans-oral submandibular gland excision

T2 - A safe and effective technique

AU - Hughes, Charles Anthony

AU - Brown, J.

PY - 2017/2/1

Y1 - 2017/2/1

N2 - Introduction In the pediatric population the submandibular gland requires removal in a number of conditions including, refractory recurrent sialoadenitis, sialolithiasis, salivary gland neoplasms and debilitating sialorrhea. In comparison to the traditional trans-cervical approach, the trans-oral route avoids a cervical scar, potential keloid formation and decreased risk of injury to the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve. This approach also eliminates the potentiality of remnant duct disease since the entire duct and papillae are removed. The article demonstrates the appropriateness of this method in the pediatric population and discusses the anatomy and technique. Methods Retrospective review of ten pediatric patients who underwent trans-oral submandibular gland excision, the series was analyzed for age, gender, indication for procedure, complications, length of hospitalization, and postoperative pathology. Patients were followed for a minimum of 12 months. Results 7 females and 3 males aged 9 to 17 underwent the procedure. Recurrent sialoadenitis, and sialolithiasis, accounted for 6 cases while salivary neoplasms (pleomorphic adenoma) accounted for 4 cases. No patient suffered vessel or nerve injury and no patient showed recurrent disease at 12 months follow-up. All glands were completely removed and no patient required conversion to the trans-cervical approach. Conclusions Trans-oral submandibular gland excision is safe and effective in the pediatric population. This method avoids a cervical scar, avoids injury to the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve, and completely removes the duct, eliminating the potentiality of remnant duct disease. The authors have performed ten trans-oral submandibular gland excisions in pediatric patients without complications.

AB - Introduction In the pediatric population the submandibular gland requires removal in a number of conditions including, refractory recurrent sialoadenitis, sialolithiasis, salivary gland neoplasms and debilitating sialorrhea. In comparison to the traditional trans-cervical approach, the trans-oral route avoids a cervical scar, potential keloid formation and decreased risk of injury to the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve. This approach also eliminates the potentiality of remnant duct disease since the entire duct and papillae are removed. The article demonstrates the appropriateness of this method in the pediatric population and discusses the anatomy and technique. Methods Retrospective review of ten pediatric patients who underwent trans-oral submandibular gland excision, the series was analyzed for age, gender, indication for procedure, complications, length of hospitalization, and postoperative pathology. Patients were followed for a minimum of 12 months. Results 7 females and 3 males aged 9 to 17 underwent the procedure. Recurrent sialoadenitis, and sialolithiasis, accounted for 6 cases while salivary neoplasms (pleomorphic adenoma) accounted for 4 cases. No patient suffered vessel or nerve injury and no patient showed recurrent disease at 12 months follow-up. All glands were completely removed and no patient required conversion to the trans-cervical approach. Conclusions Trans-oral submandibular gland excision is safe and effective in the pediatric population. This method avoids a cervical scar, avoids injury to the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve, and completely removes the duct, eliminating the potentiality of remnant duct disease. The authors have performed ten trans-oral submandibular gland excisions in pediatric patients without complications.

KW - Pediatric

KW - Salivary gland tumors

KW - Sialoandenitis

KW - Submandibular gland

KW - Trans-oral excision

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85008178970&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85008178970&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijporl.2016.11.026

DO - 10.1016/j.ijporl.2016.11.026

M3 - Article

C2 - 28109484

AN - SCOPUS:85008178970

VL - 93

SP - 13

EP - 16

JO - International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

JF - International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

SN - 0165-5876

ER -