Pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in critically ill infants undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

R. Davis Amaker, Joseph T. Dipiro, Jatinder J Bhatia

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Abstract

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a widely used therapy for neonates with respiratory failure. Because of sepsis, many of these infants require antibiotics like vancomycin during ECMO treatment. ECMO transiently alters renal function and increases the circulating blood volume by 75%. Initial vancomycin pharmacokinetics were determined in 12 infants undergoing ECMO to determine an adequate drug administration regimen. Vancomycin dosage was based on current recommendations for weight and gestational age. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by fitting the data to a two compartment model. This study yielded a mean steady-state volume of distribution of 1.1 ± 0.5 (range, 0.6 to 2.1) liters/kg and a mean vancomycin clearance of 0.78 ± 0.19 (range, 0.49 to 1.07) ml/min/kg. The mean vancomycin half-life was 16.9 ± 9.5 (range, 8.8 to 42.9) h. Nomogram- calculated creatinine clearance was a significant predictor of vancomycin terminal rate constant and clearance. These data suggest alterations in the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in infants on ECMO. With the goal of achieving vancomycin concentrations in serum above the MIC for the offending pathogen while using the least amount of the drug necessary, new administration guidelines for term infants without renal impairment undergoing ECMO should be 20 mg of vancomycin per kg at an interval of 24 h. With significant renal impairment, the interval should be extended on the basis of concentrations in serum. In comparison with previously published data, the neonates undergoing ECMO in our study demonstrated a much larger volume of distribution, a lower clearance, and consequently a longer vancomycin half-life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1139-1142
Number of pages4
JournalAntimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Volume40
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1 1996

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Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Vancomycin
Critical Illness
Pharmacokinetics
Kidney
Half-Life
Newborn Infant
Nomograms
Blood Volume
Serum
Respiratory Insufficiency
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Gestational Age
Creatinine
Sepsis
Guidelines
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in critically ill infants undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. / Amaker, R. Davis; Dipiro, Joseph T.; Bhatia, Jatinder J.

In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Vol. 40, No. 5, 01.05.1996, p. 1139-1142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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