Physical training, lifestyle education, and coronary risk factors in obese girls

Bernard Gutin, Nicholas Cucuzzo, Syed Islam, Clayton Smith, Max E. Stachura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of supervised physical training (PT) and lifestyle education (LSE) on risk factors for coronary artery disease and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus were compared in obese 7-to 11-yr-old black girls. The subjects were divided into two groups. The PT group (N = 12) completed a 5-d · wk-1, 10-wk, aerobic training program; and the LSE group participated in weekly lifestyle discussions to improve exercise and eating habits. The PT group showed a significant increase in aerobic fitness (P < 0.05) and decrease in percent body fat (P < 0.05), while the LSE group declined significantly more in dietary energy and percent of energy from fat (P < 0.05). Fasting insulin did not change significantly. The LSE group declined significantly more than the PT group in glucose (P < 0.05), and glycohemoglobin declined from baseline in both groups (P < 0.05). Lipid changes were similar in the two groups; total cholesterol/high density lipoprotein cholesterol (P < 0.01) and triglycerides (P < 0.05) declined, the low density lipoprotein (LDL)/apoproteinB ratio increased (which indicates a decrease in small dense LDL) (P < 0.05) and lipoprotein(a) increased (P < 0.05). Thus, the interventions were similarly effective in improving some diabetogenic and atherogenic factors, perhaps through different pathways; i.e, the PT improved fitness and fatness, while the LSE improved diet. Exercise and diet-induced changes in lipoprotein(a) require further investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-23
Number of pages5
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 31 1996

Fingerprint

Physical Education and Training
Life Style
Education
Lipoprotein(a)
LDL Lipoproteins
Exercise
Diet
Feeding Behavior
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
HDL Cholesterol
Adipose Tissue
Coronary Artery Disease
Fasting
Triglycerides
Fats
Cholesterol
Insulin
Lipids
Glucose

Keywords

  • CHI LDREN
  • DIET
  • EXERCISE
  • GLUCOSE
  • GLYCOHEMOGLOBIN
  • INSULIN
  • LIPIDS
  • LIPOPROTEINS
  • OBESITY

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Physical training, lifestyle education, and coronary risk factors in obese girls. / Gutin, Bernard; Cucuzzo, Nicholas; Islam, Syed; Smith, Clayton; Stachura, Max E.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 28, No. 1, 31.01.1996, p. 19-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gutin, Bernard ; Cucuzzo, Nicholas ; Islam, Syed ; Smith, Clayton ; Stachura, Max E. / Physical training, lifestyle education, and coronary risk factors in obese girls. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 1996 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 19-23.
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