Polyphenol compounds as antioxidants for disease prevention: Reactive oxygen species scavenging, enzyme regulation, and metal chelation mechanisms in E. coli and human cells

Hsiao-Chuan Wang, Julia L. Brumaghim

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Polyphenol antioxidants are abundant in the diet and have the potential to prevent diseases caused by oxidative stress, including neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and stroke. Cellular studies are critical to understanding how polyphenol antioxidants can reduce oxidative stress and contribute to disease prevention. Many studies of polyphenol antioxidant mechanisms in E. coli and human cells have focused primarily on reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging and enzyme regulation, although iron-mediated hydroxyl radical generation and DNA damage is the primary cause of cell death for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells under oxidative stress. Recently, metal chelation has also been reported as a major contributor to cellular polyphenol antioxidant activity. Because ROS scavenging, enzyme regulation, and metal chelation mechanisms for polyphenol antioxidant activity are interrelated in vitro and in cellular systems, understanding the contribution of each mechanism to polyphenol antioxidant behavior is extremely challenging. Additionally, the wide variety of assays used to examine polyphenol antioxidant behavior makes comparing results between methods and between studies difficult. The complex relationships between ROS scavenging, enzyme regulation, and metal chelation mechanisms make selecting the appropriate cellular experiments vital to accurate mechanistic results, and incorrectly selected methods can lead to conflicting conclusions. Poor understanding of polyphenol cellular uptake also results in inconsistencies between in vitro, cellular, and in vivo studies. This chapter discusses and compares the evidence to support each of the three major mechanisms for polyphenol antioxidant activity in E. coli and human cells and describes the relationships between these three cellular mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationOxidative Stress
Subtitle of host publicationDiagnostics, Prevention, and Therapy
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society
Pages99-175
Number of pages77
ISBN (Print)9780841226838
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 17 2011
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameACS Symposium Series
Volume1083
ISSN (Print)0097-6156
ISSN (Electronic)1947-5918

Fingerprint

Scavenging
Polyphenols
Chelation
Antioxidants
Escherichia coli
Reactive Oxygen Species
Enzymes
Metals
Cells
Oxygen
Oxidative stress
Cell death
Nutrition
Hydroxyl Radical
Assays
DNA
Iron

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

Wang, H-C., & Brumaghim, J. L. (2011). Polyphenol compounds as antioxidants for disease prevention: Reactive oxygen species scavenging, enzyme regulation, and metal chelation mechanisms in E. coli and human cells. In Oxidative Stress: Diagnostics, Prevention, and Therapy (pp. 99-175). (ACS Symposium Series; Vol. 1083). American Chemical Society. https://doi.org/10.1021/bk-2011-1083.ch005

Polyphenol compounds as antioxidants for disease prevention : Reactive oxygen species scavenging, enzyme regulation, and metal chelation mechanisms in E. coli and human cells. / Wang, Hsiao-Chuan; Brumaghim, Julia L.

Oxidative Stress: Diagnostics, Prevention, and Therapy. American Chemical Society, 2011. p. 99-175 (ACS Symposium Series; Vol. 1083).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Wang, H-C & Brumaghim, JL 2011, Polyphenol compounds as antioxidants for disease prevention: Reactive oxygen species scavenging, enzyme regulation, and metal chelation mechanisms in E. coli and human cells. in Oxidative Stress: Diagnostics, Prevention, and Therapy. ACS Symposium Series, vol. 1083, American Chemical Society, pp. 99-175. https://doi.org/10.1021/bk-2011-1083.ch005
Wang H-C, Brumaghim JL. Polyphenol compounds as antioxidants for disease prevention: Reactive oxygen species scavenging, enzyme regulation, and metal chelation mechanisms in E. coli and human cells. In Oxidative Stress: Diagnostics, Prevention, and Therapy. American Chemical Society. 2011. p. 99-175. (ACS Symposium Series). https://doi.org/10.1021/bk-2011-1083.ch005
Wang, Hsiao-Chuan ; Brumaghim, Julia L. / Polyphenol compounds as antioxidants for disease prevention : Reactive oxygen species scavenging, enzyme regulation, and metal chelation mechanisms in E. coli and human cells. Oxidative Stress: Diagnostics, Prevention, and Therapy. American Chemical Society, 2011. pp. 99-175 (ACS Symposium Series).
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